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dc.contributor.authorAherne, E
dc.contributor.authorHourihane, J
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-10T15:16:06Z
dc.date.available2012-01-10T15:16:06Z
dc.date.issued2009-10
dc.identifier.citationInter-hospital transport of critically ill children. 2009, 102 (9):288-90 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid19902647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/201329
dc.descriptionMost Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.en
dc.description.abstractMost Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild Welfare
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshCritical Illness
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInfant
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units, Pediatric
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshPatient Transfer
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
dc.titleInter-hospital transport of critically ill children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork. emily.aherne@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
dc.description.provinceMunster
html.description.abstractMost Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.


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