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dc.contributor.authorLucey, J M
dc.contributor.authorGavin, P
dc.contributor.authorCafferkey, M
dc.contributor.authorButler, K M
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-07T14:16:55Z
dc.date.available2011-10-07T14:16:55Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.citationPneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007. 2011, 180 (1):47-50 Ir J Med Scien
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362
dc.identifier.pmid21072618
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-010-0620-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/144300
dc.descriptionAIM: To document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007). METHODS: Subjects with pneumococcal meningitis were identified at The Children's University Hospital, Dublin through the hospital surveillance system and laboratory archives. RESULTS: 44 children were identified with S. pneumoniae meningitis. Mean age of presentation was 23.45 months (2 days to 13 years) and 28 (65%) cases were less than 12 months old. Eight (18.6%) children died. 55% of cases were left with significant deficits. Of the survivors, 7 (20%) had moderate to severe neurological sequelae. CONCLUSION: Pneumococcal meningitis is a devastating childhood disease with significant mortality and morbidity, especially in those less than 2 years of age. These data provide a baseline against which the impact of PCV7 on pneumococcal meningitis can be measured.en
dc.description.abstractTo document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007).
dc.description.abstractSubjects with pneumococcal meningitis were identified at The Children's University Hospital, Dublin through the hospital surveillance system and laboratory archives.
dc.description.abstract44 children were identified with S. pneumoniae meningitis. Mean age of presentation was 23.45 months (2 days to 13 years) and 28 (65%) cases were less than 12 months old. Eight (18.6%) children died. 55% of cases were left with significant deficits. Of the survivors, 7 (20%) had moderate to severe neurological sequelae.
dc.description.abstractPneumococcal meningitis is a devastating childhood disease with significant mortality and morbidity, especially in those less than 2 years of age. These data provide a baseline against which the impact of PCV7 on pneumococcal meningitis can be measured.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Pediatric
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIncidence
dc.subject.meshInfant
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMeningitis, Pneumococcal
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshSerotyping
dc.titlePneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Paediatrics, Children's University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin 1, Ireland. Juliette.Lucey@health.wa.gov.auen
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractTo document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007).
html.description.abstractSubjects with pneumococcal meningitis were identified at The Children's University Hospital, Dublin through the hospital surveillance system and laboratory archives.
html.description.abstract44 children were identified with S. pneumoniae meningitis. Mean age of presentation was 23.45 months (2 days to 13 years) and 28 (65%) cases were less than 12 months old. Eight (18.6%) children died. 55% of cases were left with significant deficits. Of the survivors, 7 (20%) had moderate to severe neurological sequelae.
html.description.abstractPneumococcal meningitis is a devastating childhood disease with significant mortality and morbidity, especially in those less than 2 years of age. These data provide a baseline against which the impact of PCV7 on pneumococcal meningitis can be measured.


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