• The social networks of young people in Ireland with experience of long-term foster care: some lessons for policy and practice

      Mc Mahon, Conor; Curtin, Chris (Child & Family Social Work, 2013)
      This paper presents findings from the first study of the social networks of a group of young people in Ireland who have experienced longterm foster care. The study group was composed of two groups of young people, a group who were currently in care and a group who had left the care system. The central focus was to examine the impact of foster care on the social network experience of the young people. Findings indicated that foster care impacts on the young people’s social network experience in the following ways: losing contact with extended family; a greater challenge in making and sustaining friendships; an impact on education; and an inability to maintain contact with groups and activities that are of significance. This paper also presents recommendations in relation to policy and practice, including the raising of awareness of the importance of a social network approach in working with young people with care experience.
    • Stress among nurses working in an acute hospital in Ireland.

      Donnelly, Teresa; Sligo Regional Hospital, Ireland. (British Journal of Nursing, 2014)
      Stress among nurses leads to absenteeism, reduced efficiency, long-term health problems and a decrease in the quality of patient care delivered. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted. The study's aim was to identify perceived stressors and influencing factors among nurses working in the critical and non-critical care practice areas. A convenience sample of 200 nurses were invited to complete the Bianchi Stress Questionnaire. Information was collected on demographics and daily nursing practice. Findings indicated that perceived stressors were similar in both groups. The most severe stressors included redeployment to work in other areas and staffing levels. Results from this study suggest that age, job title, professional experience and formal post-registration qualifications had no influence on stress perception. These results will increase awareness of nurses' occupational stress in Ireland.
    • A study to ascertain people’s knowledge and understanding of current measures of alcohol in drinks

      Harte, Patricia F.; Sligo General Hospital (University of Ulster, 2009-11-27)
    • Sudden (reversible) sensorineural hearing loss in pregnancy.

      Kenny, R; Patil, N; Considine, N; Department of Audiology, Sligo General Hospital, Sligo, Ireland. rsmith1968@yahoo.com (2011-03)
      Sudden hearing loss directly associated with pregnancy or birth is a little known and rare occurrence. The temporary, unilateral, low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in this case was reported after the birth of the patient's first child, and again during the third trimester of her second pregnancy.
    • Termination of pregnancy: attitudes and clinical experiences of Irish GPs and GPs-in-training.

      Murphy, Mark; Vellinga, Akke; Walkin, Scott; MacDermott, Maeve; Sligo GP Training Scheme, Sligo General Hospital, Sligo, Ireland. mark_murphy2005@yahoo.ie (2012-09)
      Termination of pregnancy (ToP) is currently illegal in Ireland. In 2010, more than 4000 women travelled from Ireland to the UK for a ToP.
    • Topical lidocaine patch 5% for acute postoperative pain control.

      Gilhooly, D; McGarvey, B; O'Mahony, H; O'Connor, T C; Anaesthesia and Pain Management, Sligo General Hospital, Sligo, Ireland. d.gilhooly@excite.com (2011-02)
      A 39-year-old para 3 woman presented for elective caesarean section (lower segment caesarean section (LSCS)) for breech presentation. The patient had a strong history of atopy and anaphylaxis to paracetamol, codeine, penicillin and latex. The patient was asthmatic, triggered by aspirin. Epidural anaesthesia was unsuccessful and LSCS was carried out under spinal anaesthesia. Postoperatively the patient was unwilling to take analgesic medication due to fear of an allergic reaction. Three 5% lidocaine patches were applied to the wound for postoperative analgesia. This reduced the patient's visual analogue scale pain score from 10/10 to 5/10 at rest and 10/10 to 7/10 with movement. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was added and this improved associated back pain, reducing the pain further to 2/10. This is the first description of lignocaine patch 5% for postoperative LSCS pain. It is suggested that this method of delivery of local anaesthetic, which is easy to apply and has minimal side effects, should be considered not as a sole agent but as part of a multimodal technique to address postoperative LSCS pain.
    • Two, four, six, eight... stop and count before it is too late! An audit on swab, needle and instrument counts in theatre.

      Donnelly, T. (2014-07)
      A concurrent audit was conducted over a four week period to determine if the counting of swabs, needles and instruments for surgery adhered to local policy and recommended guidelines. Data were collected on 30 abdominal surgical procedures. This audit highlighted failings in the count process. It identified poor communication within the multidisciplinary team. There needs to be an increased awareness about local policy, national and international guidelines regarding the counting of swabs, needles and instruments for all surgical procedures.
    • Update on smoking cessation therapies.

      Glynn, Deirdre A; Cryan, John F; Kent, Pauline; Flynn, Robert A; Kennedy, Marcus P; Department of Medicine, Sligo General Hospital, Republic of Ireland. (2009-04)
      As a reflection of an exponential increase in smoking rates throughout the world during the last century, the economic and human burden of mortality and morbidity related to smoking is now clearly defined. Smoking cessation is associated with health benefits for people of all ages. In this paper we provide a comprehensive review of current licensed pharmacological smoking cessation agents including efficacy and safety profiles, with comparisons of individual therapies available. Furthermore, we offer a prospective on the need for further testing of other agents including novel avenues of therapy.