• Schizophrenia: a five-year follow-up of patient outcome following psycho-education for caregivers.

      McWilliams, S; Hill, S; Mannion, N; Fetherston, A; Kinsella, A; O'Callaghan, E; DETECT Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, Avila House, Block 5, Blackrock Business Park, Carysfort Avenue, Co. Dublin, Ireland. stephen.mcwilliams@sjog.ie (2012-01)
      There is evidence that psycho-education courses for caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia improve the short-term outcome of the condition. However, most of the outcome studies are limited to two-year follow-up.
    • Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.

      O'Donoghue, Brian; Roche, Eric; Ranieri, Veronica F; Shannon, Stephen; Crummey, Ciaran; Murray, Johanna; Smith, Damian G; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Lyne, John P; Madigan, Kevin; et al. (2013-05-01)
      OBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.
    • Teaching recovery to medical students.

      Feeney, Larkin; Jordan, Iain; McCarron, Peter; Cluain Mhuire Community Mental Health Service, Dublin, Ireland. larkin.feeney@sjog.ie (2013-03)
      Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.
    • The therapeutic relationship after psychiatric admission.

      Roche, Eric; Madigan, Kevin; Lyne, John P; Feeney, Larkin; O'Donoghue, Brian; Cluain Mhuire Community Mental Health Service, Dublin, Ireland; †St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; and ‡Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. (2014-03)
      The therapeutic relationship is one of the most central and important factors in the treatment of mental health disorders. A better therapeutic relationship is associated with service engagement, medication adherence, and satisfaction with services. This study aimed to compare the demographic and clinical factors associated with the therapeutic relationship in voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric service users. We found that individuals who had been admitted involuntarily, who had a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, and who reported higher levels of perceived pressures on admission were more likely to have a poorer therapeutic relationship with their consultant psychiatrist. Greater levels of insight and treatment satisfaction, together with higher levels of procedural justice experienced on admission, were associated with a better therapeutic relationship. We found that the level of perceived coercion on admission was not related to the therapeutic relationship. Targeted interventions to improve the therapeutic relationship, particularly for involuntarily admitted service users, are discussed.
    • Treat negative symptoms of schizophrenia early on.

      Lyne, John P; Turner, Niall; Clarke, Mary (2012-03)
    • Use of respite care and coping strategies among Irish families of children with intellectual disabilities

      MacDonald, Elaine; Fitzsimons, Elaine; Walsh, Patricia Noonan (Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of British Institute of Learning Disabilities, 2007-03)