• Eating concerns and media influences in an Irish adolescent context.

      McNicholas, Fiona; Lydon, Alma; Lennon, Ruth; Dooley, Barbara; Department of Child Psychiatry, Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin12, Ireland. Fiona.mcnicholas@sjog.ie (John Wiley & Sons, 2009-05)
      EPICA is the first large-scale Irish study of a school-going population examining the impact of media influences on eating attitudes.
    • The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

      McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; St John of God Hospital, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin, Ireland, drstevemb@gmail.com. (2012-08-02)
      Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.
    • Expanding the test of counterfeit deviance: are sexual knowledge, experience and needs a factor in the sexualised challenging behaviour of adults with intellectual disability?

      Lockhart, Karen; Guerin, Suzanne; Shanahan, Sean; Coyle, Kevin; School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland. karen.lockhart@sjog.ie (Elsevier, 2010-01)
      It is posited within the literature that the sexualised challenging behaviour of adults with intellectual disability may be influenced by low levels of sexual knowledge, lack of sexual experience and unmet sexual needs. In this study, individuals with sexualised challenging behaviour were identified and matched for gender, age and ability level with individuals recruited to the non-sexualised and no challenging behaviour groups. All (n=24) were interviewed using the Socio-Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Tool - Revised (SSKAAT-R) and the Sexual Knowledge, Experience and Needs Scale for Intellectual Disability (Sex-Ken-ID) to assess their sexual knowledge, experience and needs. Adaptive behaviour was measured as a covariate. In the current study, contrary to expectations in the wider literature, the sexualised challenging behaviour group showed significantly higher levels of sexual knowledge in several areas when adaptive behaviour was controlled. Their needs in relation to Dating and Intimacy were also significantly higher but no differences were found between groups in relation to sexual experience. The implications of these findings for service provision are outlined along with the considerations of directions for future research.
    • Group cognitive behavioural therapy as a treatment for negative symptoms in first-episode psychosis.

      Gaynor, Keith; Dooley, Barbara; Lawlor, Elizabeth; Lawoyin, Richard; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Schools of Psychology, University College Dublin Cluain Mhuire Service, Blackrock, Ireland. keith.gaynor@gmail.com (2011-05)
      We aimed to test the idea that there is an early critical time period during a psychotic illness when patients may be more responsive to psychological treatment attention.
    • Guidelines reduce time to consultation for a liaison psychiatry service in an Irish teaching hospital.

      Lyne, J; O'Donoghue, B; Bonnar, M; Golden, D; Burke, P; Hill, M; Kinsella, A; McInerney, C; Callanan, I; Ryan, M; et al. (2012-06)
      Timeliness of response from referral to consultation is necessary to provide best standards of care to inpatients in the general hospital setting.
    • Insight into moderate cognitive impairment is associated with depression in the elderly.

      McWilliams, Stephen; Enudi, Walter; Tessema, Hiberet; Bhriain, Siobhan Ni; Swanwick, Greg (2010-02)
    • Looked after children in Dublin and their mental health needs.

      McNicholas, F; O'Connor, N; Bandyopadhyay, G; Doyle, P; O'Donovan, A; Belton, M; Lucena Clinic, 59 Orwell Rd, Rathgar, Dublin 6. fiona.mcnicholas@sjog.ie (2011-04)
      Children in care in Ireland have increased by 27% in the last decade. This population is recognized to be among the most vulnerable. This study aims to describe their placement histories, service use and mental health needs. Data was obtained on 174 children (56.5% of eligible sample) with a mean age of 10.83 (SD = 5.04). 114 (65.5%) were in care for three years or more. 29 (16.7%) did not have a SW and 49 (37.7%) had no GP 50 (28.7%) were attending CAMHS. Long term care, frequent placement changes and residential setting were significantly related with poorer outcomes and increased MH contact. Given the increase in numbers in care and the overall decrease in resource allocation to health and social care, individual care planning and prioritizing of resources are essential.
    • A multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence over the early course of illness.

      Madigan, Kevin; Brennan, Daria; Lawlor, Elizabeth; Turner, Niall; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Connor, John J; Russell, Vincent; Waddington, John L; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; St. John of God Adult Mental Health Services, Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland; DETECT Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland. kevin.madigan@sjog.ie (2013-01)
      Patients who experience the onset of psychotic illness with a comorbid diagnosis of cannabis dependence experience poor clinical outcomes. Few studies have identified interventions that reduce cannabis use and improve clinical outcome in this population.
    • Multi-element behaviour support as a model for the delivery of a human rights based approach for working with people with intellectual disabilities and behaviours that challenge

      Doody, Christina; Callan Institute for Positive Behaviour Support, St John of God Community Services (Wiley/Blackwell on behalf of British Institute of Learning Disabilities, 2009-12)
    • Nonadherence to medication four years after a first episode of psychosis and associated risk factors.

      Hill, Michele; Crumlish, Niall; Whitty, Petter; Clarke, Mary; Browne, Stephen; Kamali, Moayyad; Kinsella, Anthony; Waddington, John L; Larkin, Conall; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; et al. (2010-02)
      This study examined concurrent associations and predictors at first indication of nonadherence to antipsychotic medication four years after a first episode of psychosis.
    • Obsessive compulsive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia on clozapine and with obsessive compulsive disorder: a comparison study.

      Doyle, Mairead; Chorcorain, Aoife Ni; Griffith, Eleanor; Trimble, Tim; O'Callaghan, Eadbard; Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Service, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: mairead.doyle@sjog.ie. (2014-01)
      Obsessive compulsive symptoms are commonly reported in those with schizophrenia. Clozapine has previously been reported to induce, aggravate and alleviate these symptoms. It is unclear if these are similar to the symptoms experienced by those with obsessive compulsive disorder. This study describes the obsessive compulsive symptom profile of a population of patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine (n = 62) and compares this with patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (n = 35). All participants were attending an outpatient community mental health service. The Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (which measures the frequency and associated distress of a range of "behavioural" and "cognitive" symptoms), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a demographic questionnaire were completed. In addition the schizophrenia group treated with clozapine completed the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. The OCD group reported significantly more symptoms for all OCI subscales compared to the clozapine group. Overall fourteen (22%) of the schizophrenia treated with clozapine group had clinically significant total OCI scores. Two (3%) had documented OCS pre clozapine. De novo OCS was reported in twelve (19%) cases. Nine (11%) had documented OC symptoms pre-clozapine while only two (3%) had symptoms after clozapine was initiated. In terms of OC symptom profile, the clozapine group scored highest on the Doubting scale, a cognitive symptom whereas the OCD group scored highest on Washing, a behavioural symptom. Both groups reported greater distress with cognitive rather than behavioural symptoms. Medication including clozapine dose was not correlated with symptom severity. Anxiety correlated highly with obsessive compulsive symptoms in the Clozapine group but not the OCD group. Within the Clozapine group, Obsessing correlated highly with Unusual Thought Content. Findings suggest that obsessive compulsive symptoms in the Clozapine group may reflect a subtype of 'schizo-obsessive' disorder.
    • Parent information evenings: filling a gap in Irish child and adolescent mental health services?

      McNicholas, F; Lennon, R; Coakley, S; Doyle, P; O'Connor, N; McCourt, M; Byrne, G (2010-02)
      It is estimated that 20% of children experience psychological problems at any one time. 1 Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in Ireland are under-resourced. Recent economic downturn has hindered the possibility of increased funding to alleviative these deficits. It is now imperative that mental health professionals create innovative and cost effective solutions to promote positive mental health. Recent literature has focused on the benefits of self delivered parenting programmes, with minimal costs incurred. 2,3 Based on the developing evidence supporting self directed approaches, the Lucena Foundation has initiated a series of parent information evenings. These evenings are offered on a monthly basis, and are free to attend. To date 1,538 parents have attended. Feedback from parents has been very positive with 80.5% of them finding them useful or very useful.
    • Payment of research participants: current practice and policies of Irish research ethics committees.

      Roche, Eric; King, Romaine; Mohan, Helen M; Gavin, Blanaid; McNicholas, Fiona; Cluain Mhuire Community Mental Health Service, Dublin, Ireland. dr.roche.eric@gmail.com (2013-09)
      Payment of research participants helps to increase recruitment for research studies, but can pose ethical dilemmas. Research ethics committees (RECs) have a centrally important role in guiding this practice, but standardisation of the ethical approval process in Ireland is lacking.
    • Person Focused Training: a model for delivering positive behavioural supports to people with challenging behaviours

      McClean, Brian; Dench, Caroline; Grey, Ian; Shanahan, Sean; Fitzsimons, Elaine; Hendler, John; Corrigan, Maria (Wiley-Blackwell, 2005-05)
    • Positive programming - an organisational response to challenging behavior

      McClean, Brian; Walsh, Patrick (Institute for Applied Behavior Analysis, 1995)
    • Prevalence of item level negative symptoms in first episode psychosis diagnoses.

      Lyne, John; O'Donoghue, Brian; Owens, Elizabeth; Renwick, Laoise; Madigan, Kevin; Kinsella, Anthony; Clarke, Mary; Turner, Niall; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; DETECT Services, Avila House, Block 5 Blackrock Business Park, Blackrock, Co Dublin, Ireland. johnlyne@mail.com (2012-03)
      The relevance of negative symptoms across the diagnostic spectrum of the psychoses remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to report on prevalence of item and subscale level negative symptoms across the first episode psychosis (FEP) diagnostic spectrum in an epidemiological sample, and to ascertain whether items and subscales were more prevalent in a schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses group compared to an 'all other psychotic diagnoses' group. We measured negative symptoms in 330 patients presenting with FEP using the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), and ascertained diagnosis using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV. Prevalence of SANS items and subscales were tabulated across all psychotic diagnoses, and logistic regression analysis determined which items and subscales were predictive of schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses. SANS items were most prevalent in schizophrenia spectrum conditions but frequently presented in other FEP diagnoses, particularly substance induced psychotic disorder and Major Depressive Disorder. Brief psychotic disorder and bipolar disorders had low levels of negative symptoms. SANS items and subscales which significantly predicted schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses, were also frequently present in some of the other psychotic diagnoses. Conclusions: SANS items have high prevalence in FEP, and while commonest in schizophrenia spectrum conditions are not restricted to this diagnostic subgroup.