• Comorbid psychiatric diagnoses among individuals presenting to an addiction treatment program for alcohol dependence.

      Lyne, John Paul; O'Donoghue, Brian; Clancy, Maurice; O'Gara, Colin; Addictions Department, St. John of God Hospital, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin, Ireland. johnlyne@mail.com (2011)
      A retrospective patient record review was conducted to examine comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, and comorbid substance use, among 465 patients below 45 years of age, presenting to a national alcohol addiction treatment unit in Dublin, between 1995 and 2006. Rates were high for depressive disorder (25.3%) particularly among females (35.4%). Lifetime reported use of substances other than alcohol was 39.2%, and further analysis showed significantly higher rates of deliberate self-harm among this group. Lifetime reported use of ecstasy was also significantly associated with depression in this alcohol-dependent population using logistic regression analysis. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.
    • Depression, anxiety and cardiovascular disease: which symptoms are associated with increased risk in community dwelling older adults?

      Gallagher, Damien; O'Regan, Claire; Savva, George M; Cronin, Hillary; Lawlor, Brian A; Kenny, Rose A; Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Services, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland. gallagherdamien@hotmail.com (2012-12-15)
      Depression is a risk factor for Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). It has been reported that somatic symptoms of depression and not cognitive symptoms are associated with increased risk although findings have been inconsistent. Few studies have examined whether co-morbid anxiety confers additive risk.
    • Group cognitive behavioural therapy as a treatment for negative symptoms in first-episode psychosis.

      Gaynor, Keith; Dooley, Barbara; Lawlor, Elizabeth; Lawoyin, Richard; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Schools of Psychology, University College Dublin Cluain Mhuire Service, Blackrock, Ireland. keith.gaynor@gmail.com (2011-05)
      We aimed to test the idea that there is an early critical time period during a psychotic illness when patients may be more responsive to psychological treatment attention.
    • The therapeutic relationship after psychiatric admission.

      Roche, Eric; Madigan, Kevin; Lyne, John P; Feeney, Larkin; O'Donoghue, Brian; Cluain Mhuire Community Mental Health Service, Dublin, Ireland; †St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; and ‡Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. (2014-03)
      The therapeutic relationship is one of the most central and important factors in the treatment of mental health disorders. A better therapeutic relationship is associated with service engagement, medication adherence, and satisfaction with services. This study aimed to compare the demographic and clinical factors associated with the therapeutic relationship in voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric service users. We found that individuals who had been admitted involuntarily, who had a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, and who reported higher levels of perceived pressures on admission were more likely to have a poorer therapeutic relationship with their consultant psychiatrist. Greater levels of insight and treatment satisfaction, together with higher levels of procedural justice experienced on admission, were associated with a better therapeutic relationship. We found that the level of perceived coercion on admission was not related to the therapeutic relationship. Targeted interventions to improve the therapeutic relationship, particularly for involuntarily admitted service users, are discussed.