• The involvement of calcium and MAP kinase signaling pathways in the production of radiation-induced bystander effects.

      Lyng, F M; Maguire, P; McClean, B; Seymour, C; Mothersill, C (2006-04)
      Much evidence now exists regarding radiation-induced bystander effects, but the mechanisms involved in the transduction of the signal are still unclear. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways have been linked to growth factor-mediated regulation of cellular events such as proliferation, senescence, differentiation and apoptosis. Activation of multiple MAPK pathways such as the ERK, JNK and p38 pathways have been shown to occur after exposure of cells to radiation and a variety of other toxic stresses. Previous studies have shown oxidative stress and calcium signaling to be important in radiation-induced bystander effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate MAPK signaling pathways in bystander cells exposed to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and the role of oxidative metabolism and calcium signaling in the induction of bystander responses. Human keratinocytes (HPV-G cell line) were irradiated (0.005-5 Gy) using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The medium was harvested 1 h postirradiation and transferred to recipient HPV-G cells. Phosphorylated forms of p38, JNK and ERK were studied by immunofluorescence 30 min-24 h after exposure to ICCM. Inhibitors of the ERK pathway (PD98059 and U0126), the JNK pathway (SP600125), and the p38 pathway (SB203580) were used to investigate whether bystander-induced cell death could be blocked. Cells were also incubated with ICCM in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, EGTA, verapamil, nifedipine and thapsigargin to investigate whether bystander effects could be inhibited because of the known effects on calcium homeostasis. Activated forms of JNK and ERK proteins were observed after exposure to ICCM. Inhibition of the ERK pathway appeared to increase bystander-induced apoptosis, while inhibition of the JNK pathway appeared to decrease apoptosis. In addition, reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and calcium signaling were found to be important modulators of bystander responses. Further investigations of these signaling pathways may aid in the identification of novel therapeutic targets.
    • Modulation of Radiation responses by pre-exposure to irradiated Cell conditioned medium.

      Maguire, Paula; Mothersill, Carmel; McClean, Brendan; Seymour, Colin; Lyng, Fiona M (Radiation Research Society, 2007-04)
      The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure of HPV-G cells to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) could induce an adaptive response if the cells were subsequently challenged with a higher ICCM dose. Clonogenic survival and major steps in the cascade leading to apoptosis, such as calcium influx and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, were examined to determine whether these events could be modified by giving a priming dose of ICCM before the challenge dose. Clonogenic survival data indicated an ICCM-induced adaptive response in HPV-G cells "primed" with 5 mGy or 0.5 Gy ICCM for 24 h and then exposed to 0.5 Gy or 5 Gy ICCM. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were found to be involved in the bystander-induced cell death. Calcium fluxes varied in magnitude across the exposed cell population, and a significant number of the primed HPV-G cells did not respond to the challenge ICCM dose. No significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed when HPV-G cells were exposed to 0.5 Gy ICCM for 24 h followed by exposure to 5 Gy ICCM for 6 h. Exposure of HPV-G cells to 5 mGy ICCM for 24 h followed by exposure to 0.5 Gy ICCM for 18 h caused a significant increase in mitochondrial mass and a change in mitochondrial location, events associated with the perpetuation of genomic instability. This study has shown that a priming dose of ICCM has the ability to induce an adaptive response in HPV-G cells subsequently exposed to a challenge dose of ICCM.
    • Nodular fasciitis: A pseudomalignant clonal neoplasm characterized by USP gene rearrangements and spontaneous regression

      Hennebry, Jennifer; Mulholland, Douglas; Tchrakian, Nairi; Martin Gillham, Charles; Julian Beddy, Peter; Mai O'Donnell, Dearbhaile; Eibhlín McMenamin, Máirín (Edorium Journals, 2017-01)
      Introduction: Nodular fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly growing, self-limited, myofibroblastic neoplasm that typically arises in subcutaneous tissues of young adults and regresses spontaneously. Nodular fasciitis mimics sarcoma on clinical, radiological, and histological grounds and is usually, diagnosed following excision. Case Report: A 26-year-old female presented at surveillance computed tomography (CT) scan one year post-treatment for stage 1c ovarian dysgerminoma with a 4 cm axillary soft tissue mass, radiologically suspicious for metastasis with subclavian vein invasion. Histopathology of core biopsies favored NF, confirmed by detection of USP6 gene rearrangements by FISH analysis. This case describes an unusual relatively deep NF, suspicious for metastasis on CT scan with confirmed spontaneous regression over two years. Conclusion: Nodular fasciitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rapidly growing enhancing soft tissue masses. Molecular cytogenetic testing of USP6 gene rearrangements allows definitive diagnosis on core biopsies in challenging cases, permitting a conservative approach and avoiding potentially radical and unnecessary surgery.