• Abnormal hCG levels in a patient with treated stage I seminoma: a diagnostic dilemma.

      Aherne, Noel J; Small, Cormac A; McVey, Gerard P; Fitzpatrick, David G; Armstrong, John G; Department of Radiation Oncology, St, Luke's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. noelaherne@eircom.net (BioMed Central, 2008)
      BACKGROUND: We report the case of a patient with treated Stage Ia seminoma who was found to have an elevated beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) on routine follow - up. This instigated restaging and could have lead to commencement of chemotherapy. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was a bodybuilder, and following a negative metastatic work - up, admitted to injecting exogenous beta hCG. This was done to reduce withdrawal symptoms from androgen abuse. The patient remains well eight years post diagnosis. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the need for surgical oncologists to conduct vigilant screening of young male patients with a history of testicular germ cell tumours and who may indulge in steroid abuse.
    • Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition.

      Baeyens, A; Thierens, H; Claes, K; Poppe, B; Messiaen, L; De Ridder, L; Vral, A (London, Lewis, 2002-12-02)
      The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75-78%).
    • A comparison of multimodal therapy and surgery for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

      Walsh, T N; Noonan, N; Hollywood, D; Kelly, A; Keeling, N; Hennessy, T P (1996-08-15)
      Uncontrolled studies suggest that a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy improves the survival of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. We conducted a prospective, randomized trial comparing surgery alone with combined chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery.
    • Gene expression and epigenetic discovery screen reveal methylation of SFRP2 in prostate cancer.

      Perry, Antoinette S; O'Hurley, Gillian; Raheem, Omer A; Brennan, Kevin; Wong, Simon; O'Grady, Anthony; Kennedy, Anne-Marie; Marignol, Laure; Murphy, Therese M; Sullivan, Linda; et al. (2013-04-15)
      Aberrant activation of Wnts is common in human cancers, including prostate. Hypermethylation associated transcriptional silencing of Wnt antagonist genes SFRPs (Secreted Frizzled-Related Proteins) is a frequent oncogenic event. The significance of this is not known in prostate cancer. The objectives of our study were to (i) profile Wnt signaling related gene expression and (ii) investigate methylation of Wnt antagonist genes in prostate cancer. Using TaqMan Low Density Arrays, we identified 15 Wnt signaling related genes with significantly altered expression in prostate cancer; the majority of which were upregulated in tumors. Notably, histologically benign tissue from men with prostate cancer appeared more similar to tumor (r = 0.76) than to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; r = 0.57, p < 0.001). Overall, the expression profile was highly similar between tumors of high (≥ 7) and low (≤ 6) Gleason scores. Pharmacological demethylation of PC-3 cells with 5-Aza-CdR reactivated 39 genes (≥ 2-fold); 40% of which inhibit Wnt signaling. Methylation frequencies in prostate cancer were 10% (2/20) (SFRP1), 64.86% (48/74) (SFRP2), 0% (0/20) (SFRP4) and 60% (12/20) (SFRP5). SFRP2 methylation was detected at significantly lower frequencies in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN; 30%, (6/20), p = 0.0096), tumor adjacent benign areas (8.82%, (7/69), p < 0.0001) and BPH (11.43% (4/35), p < 0.0001). The quantitative level of SFRP2 methylation (normalized index of methylation) was also significantly higher in tumors (116) than in the other samples (HGPIN = 7.45, HB = 0.47, and BPH = 0.12). We show that SFRP2 hypermethylation is a common event in prostate cancer. SFRP2 methylation in combination with other epigenetic markers may be a useful biomarker of prostate cancer.
    • In silico analysis and DHPLC screening strategy identifies novel apoptotic gene targets of aberrant promoter hypermethylation in prostate cancer.

      Murphy, Therese M; Sullivan, Linda; Lane, Caroline; O'Connor, Lisa; Barrett, Ciara; Hollywood, Donal; Lynch, Thomas; Lawler, Mark; Perry, Antoinette S; Prostate Molecular Oncology, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. murphyth@tcd.ie (Wiley, 2011-01-01)
      Aberrant DNA methylation has been implicated as a key survival mechanism in cancer, whereby promoter hypermethylation silences genes essential for many cellular processes including apoptosis. Limited data is available on the methylation profile of apoptotic genes in prostate cancer (CaP). The aim of this study was to profile methylation of apoptotic-related genes in CaP using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC).
    • Quantification of organ motion during chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography.

      Chong, Irene; Hawkins, Maria; Hansen, Vibeke; Thomas, Karen; McNair, Helen; O'Neill, Brian; Aitken, Alexandra; Tait, Diana; Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey, United Kingdom. (Elsevier, 2011-11-15)
      There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic (Σ) and random (σ) setup errors.
    • Small-cell carcinoma of the cervix at 23 weeks gestation.

      Smyth, Elizabeth C; Korpanty, Grzegorz; McCaffrey, John A; Mulligan, Niall; Carney, Desmond N (2010-06-20)
    • Toxicity of cetuximab versus cisplatin concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSCC).

      Walsh, Lorraine; Gillham, Charles; Dunne, Mary; Fraser, Ian; Hollywood, Donal; Armstrong, John; Thirion, Pierre; Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (Elsevier, 2011-01)
      We retrospectively reviewed acute toxicity with cetuximab and radiotherapy, comparing it with a matched cisplatin group. The cetuximab group experienced significantly more toxicity--grade ≥3 oral mucositis (p=0.014), skin dermatitis (p=0.0004), ≥10% weight loss (p=0.03), and enteral feeding requirement (p=0.05). This finding of enhanced toxicity is similar to recent publications.