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dc.contributor.authorFarren, Conor K
dc.contributor.authorScimeca, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWu, Ran
dc.contributor.authorMalley, Stephanie O
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T14:17:54Z
dc.date.available2011-04-27T14:17:54Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-01
dc.identifier.citationA double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sertraline with naltrexone for alcohol dependence. 2009, 99 (1-3):317-21 Drug Alcohol Dependen
dc.identifier.issn1879-0046
dc.identifier.pmid18644685
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2008.06.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128777
dc.description.abstractSignificant preclinical evidence exists for a synergistic interaction between the opioid and the serotonin systems in determining alcohol consumption. Naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, is approved for the treatment of alcohol dependence. This double-blind placebo-controlled study examined whether the efficacy of naltrexone would be augmented by concurrent treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin receptor uptake inhibitor (SSRI).
dc.description.abstractOne hundred and thirteen participants meeting DSM IV alcohol dependence criteria, who were abstinent from alcohol between 5 and 30 days, were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments at two sites. One group received naltrexone 12.5 mg once daily for 3 days, 25 mg once daily for 4 days, and 50 mg once daily for the next 11 weeks, together with placebo sertraline. The other group received naltrexone as outlined and simultaneously received sertraline 50 mg once daily for 2 weeks, followed by 100 mg once daily for 10 weeks. Both groups received group relapse prevention psychotherapy on a weekly basis.
dc.description.abstractCompliance and attendance rates were comparable and high. The groups did not differ on the two primary outcomes, time to first drink and time to relapse to heavy drinking, or on secondary treatment outcomes. With the exception of sexual side effects which were more common in the combination group, most adverse events were similar for the two conditions.
dc.description.abstractAs the doses are tested in combination with specialized behavioral therapy, this study does not provide sufficient evidence for the combined use of sertraline and naltrexone above naltrexone alone.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urldoi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2008.06.006en
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAge of Onset
dc.subject.meshAlcoholism
dc.subject.meshCognitive Therapy
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Method
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy, Combination
dc.subject.meshEthnic Groups
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMarital Status
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNaltrexone
dc.subject.meshNarcotic Antagonists
dc.subject.meshPatient Compliance
dc.subject.meshPatient Selection
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales
dc.subject.meshPsychotherapy
dc.subject.meshSerotonin Uptake Inhibitors
dc.subject.meshSertraline
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.titleA double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sertraline with naltrexone for alcohol dependence.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentYale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, 1 Long Wharf, New Haven, CT 06419, United States. cfarren@stpatsmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalDrug and alcohol dependenceen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractSignificant preclinical evidence exists for a synergistic interaction between the opioid and the serotonin systems in determining alcohol consumption. Naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, is approved for the treatment of alcohol dependence. This double-blind placebo-controlled study examined whether the efficacy of naltrexone would be augmented by concurrent treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin receptor uptake inhibitor (SSRI).
html.description.abstractOne hundred and thirteen participants meeting DSM IV alcohol dependence criteria, who were abstinent from alcohol between 5 and 30 days, were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments at two sites. One group received naltrexone 12.5 mg once daily for 3 days, 25 mg once daily for 4 days, and 50 mg once daily for the next 11 weeks, together with placebo sertraline. The other group received naltrexone as outlined and simultaneously received sertraline 50 mg once daily for 2 weeks, followed by 100 mg once daily for 10 weeks. Both groups received group relapse prevention psychotherapy on a weekly basis.
html.description.abstractCompliance and attendance rates were comparable and high. The groups did not differ on the two primary outcomes, time to first drink and time to relapse to heavy drinking, or on secondary treatment outcomes. With the exception of sexual side effects which were more common in the combination group, most adverse events were similar for the two conditions.
html.description.abstractAs the doses are tested in combination with specialized behavioral therapy, this study does not provide sufficient evidence for the combined use of sertraline and naltrexone above naltrexone alone.


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