Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Miriam
dc.contributor.authorDornan, Julieanne
dc.contributor.authorRutledge, Emer
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Helen
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Harry G
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T14:06:05Z
dc.date.available2011-04-27T14:06:05Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-27T14:06:05Z
dc.identifier.citationExtra information about treatment is too much for the patient with psychosis., 32 (6):369-76 Int J Law Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1873-6386
dc.identifier.pmid19793614
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijlp.2009.09.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128774
dc.description.abstractCase law across jurisdictions requires ever more complete disclosure of material facts when obtaining consent to treatment.
dc.description.abstractTo determine whether giving extra information impairs the mental capacity to make decisions about treatment.
dc.description.abstractThe MacCAT-T, MacCAT-FP, PANSS and GAF were administered to 88 detained forensic patients with psychosis. Two positive and two negative facts were given about each of two anti-psychotic drugs, and no treatment (twelve items). A choice was elicited. The criterion for incompetence was inability to express a choice. Two extra positive and two extra negative facts about each of the three options were given (twelve extra items) and a choice was again elicited, while repeating the MacCAT-T.
dc.description.abstractGiving extra information led to a decline in the total score on the MacCAT-T. Twenty one were initially unable to make a choice (24%). After additional information, 33 were incapable (37.5%, Chi-squared p<0.001). Those initially incapable had the lowest scores on all measures of functional capacity and GAF, with highest scores for symptoms. Those able to choose a treatment option had the highest levels of function and least symptoms. Those who became incapable had intermediate scores.
dc.description.abstractGiving extra information made an extra 15% unable to choose. Clinical judgement must be exercised concerning the amount of information disclosed. Deciding what is material to the individual is arbitrary when so few items of information can be processed. Greater use of guardianship and independent second opinions is recommended.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urldoi:10.1016/j.ijlp.2009.09.006en
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshChoice Behavior
dc.subject.meshCommitment of Mentally Ill
dc.subject.meshComprehension
dc.subject.meshDecision Making
dc.subject.meshDisclosure
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInformed Consent
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMental Competency
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topic
dc.subject.meshPatient Participation
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychology
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.titleExtra information about treatment is too much for the patient with psychosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentral Mental Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of law and psychiatryen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractCase law across jurisdictions requires ever more complete disclosure of material facts when obtaining consent to treatment.
html.description.abstractTo determine whether giving extra information impairs the mental capacity to make decisions about treatment.
html.description.abstractThe MacCAT-T, MacCAT-FP, PANSS and GAF were administered to 88 detained forensic patients with psychosis. Two positive and two negative facts were given about each of two anti-psychotic drugs, and no treatment (twelve items). A choice was elicited. The criterion for incompetence was inability to express a choice. Two extra positive and two extra negative facts about each of the three options were given (twelve extra items) and a choice was again elicited, while repeating the MacCAT-T.
html.description.abstractGiving extra information led to a decline in the total score on the MacCAT-T. Twenty one were initially unable to make a choice (24%). After additional information, 33 were incapable (37.5%, Chi-squared p<0.001). Those initially incapable had the lowest scores on all measures of functional capacity and GAF, with highest scores for symptoms. Those able to choose a treatment option had the highest levels of function and least symptoms. Those who became incapable had intermediate scores.
html.description.abstractGiving extra information made an extra 15% unable to choose. Clinical judgement must be exercised concerning the amount of information disclosed. Deciding what is material to the individual is arbitrary when so few items of information can be processed. Greater use of guardianship and independent second opinions is recommended.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record