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dc.contributor.authorTsakanikos, Elias
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Jane
dc.contributor.authorKravariti, Eugenia
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paul
dc.contributor.authorBouras, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T10:51:55Z
dc.date.available2011-04-27T10:51:55Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-27T10:51:55Z
dc.identifier.citationThe role of ethnicity in clinical psychopathology and care pathways of adults with intellectual disabilities., 31 (2):410-5 Res Dev Disabilen
dc.identifier.issn1873-3379
dc.identifier.pmid19932597
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ridd.2009.10.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128750
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to explore whether people with intellectual disability from ethnic minority groups have higher rates of mental health problems and access different care pathways than their White counterparts. Clinical and socio-demographic data were collected for 806 consecutive new referrals to a specialist mental health service for people with intellectual disabilities in South London. Referrals were grouped according to their ethnic origin. The analyses showed that there was an over-representation of referrals from ethnic minority groups with diagnoses of schizophrenia spectrum disorder. In addition, Black participants were more likely to have an autistic spectrum disorder. Referrals of ethnic minority groups were considerably younger than White referrals, and less likely to be in supported residences. The results are discussed in the context of cultural and familial factors in particular ethnic groups that may play an important role in accessing and using mental health services.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urldoi:10.1016/j.ridd.2009.10.007en
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAfrican Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild Development Disorders, Pervasive
dc.subject.meshCritical Pathways
dc.subject.meshDementia
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models
dc.subject.meshLondon
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders
dc.subject.meshMental Retardation
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Care
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshSocial Work
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleThe role of ethnicity in clinical psychopathology and care pathways of adults with intellectual disabilities.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEstia Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, 66 Snowsfields, London SE1 3SS, UK. elias.tsakanikos@kcl.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalResearch in developmental disabilitiesen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to explore whether people with intellectual disability from ethnic minority groups have higher rates of mental health problems and access different care pathways than their White counterparts. Clinical and socio-demographic data were collected for 806 consecutive new referrals to a specialist mental health service for people with intellectual disabilities in South London. Referrals were grouped according to their ethnic origin. The analyses showed that there was an over-representation of referrals from ethnic minority groups with diagnoses of schizophrenia spectrum disorder. In addition, Black participants were more likely to have an autistic spectrum disorder. Referrals of ethnic minority groups were considerably younger than White referrals, and less likely to be in supported residences. The results are discussed in the context of cultural and familial factors in particular ethnic groups that may play an important role in accessing and using mental health services.


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