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dc.contributor.authorZanelli, Jolanta
dc.contributor.authorReichenberg, Abraham
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKravariti, Eugenia
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Paola
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Craig
dc.contributor.authorZanelli, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorDemjaha, Arsime
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter B
dc.contributor.authorDoody, Gillian A
dc.contributor.authorKapur, Shitij
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robin M
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T10:44:54Z
dc.date.available2011-04-27T10:44:54Z
dc.date.issued2010-01
dc.identifier.citationSpecific and generalized neuropsychological deficits: a comparison of patients with various first-episode psychosis presentations. 2010, 167 (1):78-85 Am J Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1535-7228
dc.identifier.pmid19952077
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ajp.2009.09010118
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128749
dc.description.abstractOverwhelming evidence suggests that compromised neuropsychological function is frequently observed in schizophrenia. Neurocognitive dysfunction has often been reported in other psychotic disorders, although there are inconsistencies in the literature. In the context of four distinct diagnostic groups, the authors compared neuropsychological performance among patients experiencing their first psychotic episode.
dc.description.abstractData were derived from a population-based, case-control study of patients with first-episode psychosis. A neuropsychological test battery was administered to patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (N=65), bipolar disorder or mania (N=37), depressive psychosis (N=39), or other psychotic disorders (N=46) following index presentation, as well as to healthy comparison subjects (N=177). The presence of specific and generalized cognitive deficits was examined.
dc.description.abstractThe schizophrenia group presented widespread neuropsychological impairments and performed significantly worse than healthy comparison subjects on most neuropsychological measures. Patients with other psychotic disorders and depressive psychosis also demonstrated widespread impairments. Deficits in patients with bipolar disorder or mania were less pervasive but evident in performance scores on verbal memory and fluency tests. Differences between the four patient groups and healthy comparison subjects and among the patient groups were attenuated after controlling for differences in general cognitive ability (IQ).
dc.description.abstractEarly in their course, cognitive deficits are present in all psychotic disorders but are most severe and pervasive in schizophrenia and least pervasive in bipolar disorder and mania.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/167/1/78en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder, Major
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differential
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales
dc.subject.meshPsychometrics
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychology
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Index
dc.titleSpecific and generalized neuropsychological deficits: a comparison of patients with various first-episode psychosis presentations.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Psychiatry, PO63, Division of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK. jolanta.zanelli@iop.kcl.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalThe American journal of psychiatryen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractOverwhelming evidence suggests that compromised neuropsychological function is frequently observed in schizophrenia. Neurocognitive dysfunction has often been reported in other psychotic disorders, although there are inconsistencies in the literature. In the context of four distinct diagnostic groups, the authors compared neuropsychological performance among patients experiencing their first psychotic episode.
html.description.abstractData were derived from a population-based, case-control study of patients with first-episode psychosis. A neuropsychological test battery was administered to patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (N=65), bipolar disorder or mania (N=37), depressive psychosis (N=39), or other psychotic disorders (N=46) following index presentation, as well as to healthy comparison subjects (N=177). The presence of specific and generalized cognitive deficits was examined.
html.description.abstractThe schizophrenia group presented widespread neuropsychological impairments and performed significantly worse than healthy comparison subjects on most neuropsychological measures. Patients with other psychotic disorders and depressive psychosis also demonstrated widespread impairments. Deficits in patients with bipolar disorder or mania were less pervasive but evident in performance scores on verbal memory and fluency tests. Differences between the four patient groups and healthy comparison subjects and among the patient groups were attenuated after controlling for differences in general cognitive ability (IQ).
html.description.abstractEarly in their course, cognitive deficits are present in all psychotic disorders but are most severe and pervasive in schizophrenia and least pervasive in bipolar disorder and mania.


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