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dc.contributor.authorReininghaus, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorCraig, Thomas K J
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Helen L
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gerard
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paul
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Paola
dc.contributor.authorDoody, Gillian A
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter B
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robin M
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Craig
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-27T10:31:14Z
dc.date.available2011-04-27T10:31:14Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.identifier.citationEthnic identity, perceptions of disadvantage, and psychosis: findings from the ÆSOP study. 2010, 124 (1-3):43-8 Schizophr. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn1573-2509
dc.identifier.pmid20855184
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2010.08.038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/128740
dc.description.abstractMany studies have shown that rates of psychosis are elevated in the Black and minority ethnic (BME) population in the UK. One important, but relatively less researched explanation of these high rates may be social adversity associated with acculturation processes. Strong identification with an ethnic minority group subjected to social disadvantage may exert adverse effects on individuals from BME groups. Using data from a large epidemiological case-control study of first-episode psychosis, we aimed to investigate whether strong ethnic identification is a factor contributing to the excess of psychosis in BME groups compared with the White British, after adjustment for perceptions of disadvantage. All cases with a first episode of psychosis presenting to specialist mental health services within tightly defined catchment areas in London and Nottingham, UK, and geographically matched community controls were included in the study. Data were collected on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, perceptions of disadvantage, and identification with one's own ethnic group. Analysis was performed on data from 139 cases and 234 controls. There was evidence that, as levels of ethnic identification increased, the odds of psychosis increased in the BME but not in the White British group, independent of potential confounders. However, the association between strong ethnic identity and psychosis in BME individuals was attenuated and non-significant when controlled for perceived disadvantage. Strong identification with an ethnic minority group may be a potential contributory factor of the high rates of psychosis in the BME population, the effects of which may be explained by perceptions of disadvantage.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urldoi:10.1016/j.schres.2010.08.038en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAfrican Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
dc.subject.meshEthnic Groups
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLondon
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMental Health Services
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshMinority Groups
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshSocial Environment
dc.subject.meshSocial Perception
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleEthnic identity, perceptions of disadvantage, and psychosis: findings from the ÆSOP study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Barts and the London School of Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, UK. u.reininghaus@qmul.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalSchizophrenia researchen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractMany studies have shown that rates of psychosis are elevated in the Black and minority ethnic (BME) population in the UK. One important, but relatively less researched explanation of these high rates may be social adversity associated with acculturation processes. Strong identification with an ethnic minority group subjected to social disadvantage may exert adverse effects on individuals from BME groups. Using data from a large epidemiological case-control study of first-episode psychosis, we aimed to investigate whether strong ethnic identification is a factor contributing to the excess of psychosis in BME groups compared with the White British, after adjustment for perceptions of disadvantage. All cases with a first episode of psychosis presenting to specialist mental health services within tightly defined catchment areas in London and Nottingham, UK, and geographically matched community controls were included in the study. Data were collected on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, perceptions of disadvantage, and identification with one's own ethnic group. Analysis was performed on data from 139 cases and 234 controls. There was evidence that, as levels of ethnic identification increased, the odds of psychosis increased in the BME but not in the White British group, independent of potential confounders. However, the association between strong ethnic identity and psychosis in BME individuals was attenuated and non-significant when controlled for perceived disadvantage. Strong identification with an ethnic minority group may be a potential contributory factor of the high rates of psychosis in the BME population, the effects of which may be explained by perceptions of disadvantage.


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