• Risk factors for recurrent laryngeal nerve neuropraxia postthyroidectomy.

      Sheahan, Patrick; O'Connor, Ann; Murphy, Matthew S; Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. sheahan.patrick@sivuh.ie (2012-06)
      Despite preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), transient vocal cord paralysis (VCP) occurs after 1.2% to 10.9% of thyroidectomies. The objective of this study was to study risk factors for transient VCP after thyroidectomy.
    • Safety of body piercings for rheumatology patients on immunosuppressive medications.

      O'Connor, M B; Phelan, M J (Irish Medical Journal (IMJ), 2012-05)
    • Second toe swelling: Nora's lesion or glomus tumour, case report and literature review.

      Mohammad, A; Kilcoyne, A; Blake, S; Phelan, M; Department of Rheumatology and Radiology, South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. ausafmohammad@gmail.com (2012-09)
      We report a rare case of bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (BPOP, Nora's lesion) of the right second toe in a 60-year-old man who presented with painful, bluish and bulbous swelling of the right second toe without any break in the skin.
    • Skin Cancer Awareness Amongst Irish Golfers

      McCarthy, Siobhan; Paul, Lyndsey; O’Connell, Michael (Irish Medical Journal, 2017-09)
      The aim of this study was to assess skin cancer awareness and identify the UV protective measures used by golfers within the Munster region of Ireland.
    • Spontaneous cholecystocutaneous fistula.

      Khan, Ata; Rajendran, Simon; Baban, Chwanrow; Murphy, Micheal; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; Department of Surgery, South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. (2011)
    • A study of needle stick injuries among non-consultant hospital doctors in Ireland.

      O'Connor, M B; Hannon, M J; Cagney, D; Harrington, U; O'Brien, F; Hardiman, N; O'Connor, R; Courtney, K; O'Connor, C; Department of Medicine, South Infirmary, Victoria University Hospital, Old, Blackrock Road, Cork, Ireland. mortimeroconnor@gmail.com (2012-02-01)
      INTRODUCTION: NCHDs are exposed to a great number of blood-borne infections. Needle stick injuries are possibly the main route of acquiring such infections from a non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) perspective. This study examines NCHDs experiences surrounding needle stick injuries. METHODS: A cross-sectional self-administered anonymous questionnaire survey was conducted on 185 NCHDs working in a clinical setting among seven teaching hospitals in Ireland. Implied consent was obtained. The data was analysed using Excel spreadsheets. Ethical approval was received. RESULTS: A response rate of 85.4% (158/185) was achieved. Findings of the study are shown in the manuscript table. CONCLUSIONS: A needle stick injury (NI) history is greater among surgical NCHDs than medical NCHDs. The level of disposable glove usage is worryingly poor. Training in sharps handling and dealing with a NI needs to be addressed. HIV is the blood-borne infection most fear of being contracting as a consequence of a NI.
    • Studying a disease with no home--lessons in trial recruitment from the PATCH II study.

      Thomas, Kim S; Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, King's Meadow Campus, Nottingham NG7 2NR, UK. kim.thomas@nottingham.ac.uk. (2010)
      Cellulitis is a very common condition that often recurs. The PATCH II study was designed to explore the possibility of preventing future episodes of cellulitis, with resultant cost savings for the NHS. This was the first trial to be undertaken by the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network. As such, it was the first to test a recruitment model that involved many busy clinicians each contributing just a few patients.
    • Sun exposure and the use of sunscreen among rheumatology inflammatory arthropathy patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy.

      McKeogh, John; O'Connor, Mortimer B; Bond, Ursula; Swan, Joan; Phelan, Mark J; Medicine, South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. (2012-06)
    • Thyroid Tubercle of Zuckerkandl: importance in thyroid surgery.

      Sheahan, Patrick; Murphy, Matthew S; Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, South Infirmary Victoria, University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. sheahan.patrick@sivuh.ie (2012-02-01)
      OBJECTIVE: The Tubercle of Zuckerkandl (TZ), which is the remant of the lateral thyroid process, is an important anatomic structure that serves as a reliable landmark for the recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery. Furthermore, removal of the TZ is critical for the adequate performance of a total thyroidectomy. However, there is little mention of the TZ in surgical textbooks or papers. METHODS: Prospective observational study of 138 consecutive thyroid surgeries. The presence of the TZ, its size, and relationship to the recurrent laryngeal nerve, were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 211 thyroid lobes were included in the study. The TZ was identified in 61.1% of all thyroid lobes. The median size was 8 mm (range = 3-40 mm). A TZ was more commonly identified on the right (69.6%) than on the left side (53.2%) (P = .02). The recurrent laryngeal nerve was found deep to the TZ in 98.4% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: A TZ is present in the majority of thyroid lobes. Awareness of the TZ is critical in performing an adequate total thyroidectomy, and is very useful as a landmark for the recurrent laryngeal nerve.
    • Type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to carboxymethylcellulose following intra-articular triamcinolone injection.

      Field, Sinead; Falvey, Eanna; Barry, Josephine; Bourke, John; Dermatology Department, South Infirmary-Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. sineadfield@hotmail.com (2009-11)
    • Type 1 hypersensitivity reaction to carboxymethylcellulose following intra-articular triamcinolone injection.

      Field, Sinead; Falvey, Eanna; Barry, Josephine; Bourke, John; Dermatology Department, South Infirmary-Victoria University Hospital, Cork,, Ireland. sineadfield@hotmail.com (2012-02-01)
    • An unusual rash in a neonate. X-linked dominant ichthyosis (XLDI).

      Moriarty, B; Bourke, J F; Fitzgibbon, J; Irvine, A D; Department of Dermatology, South Infirmary, Victoria Hospital, Cork, Ireland., blaithinl@hotmail.com (2012-02-01)
    • An unusual rash in a neonate. X-linked dominant ichthyosis (XLDI).

      Moriarty, B; Bourke, J F; Fitzgibbon, J; Irvine, A D; Department of Dermatology, South Infirmary, Victoria Hospital, Cork, Ireland. blaithinl@hotmail.com (2010-04)