• Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

      Davies, Karen; Conlon, Kevin C; Department of Surgery, Trinity College Dublin, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. (2012-02-01)
      Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.
    • Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

      Davies, Karen; Conlon, Kevin C; Department of Surgery, Trinity College Dublin, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. (Current gastroenterology reports, 2009-04)
      Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.
    • Prevalence of lymphoedema and quality of life among patients attending a hospital-based wound management and vascular clinic.

      Gethin, Georgina; Byrne, Danielle; Tierney, Sean; Strapp, Helen; Cowman, Seamus; FFNMRCSI, Centre for Nursing and Midwifery Research, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. ggethin@rcsi.ie (International wound journal, 2012-04)
      Lymphoedema is a chronic, incurable, debilitating condition, usually affecting a limb and causes discomfort, pain, heaviness, limited motion, unsatisfactory appearance and impacts on quality of life. However, there is a paucity of prevalence data on this condition. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of lymphoedema among persons attending wound management and vascular clinics in an acute tertiary referral hospital. Four hundred and eighteen patients meeting the inclusion criteria were assessed. A prevalence rate of 2.63% (n = 11) was recorded. Thirty-six percent (n = 4) had history of cellulitis and broken skin, 64% (n = 7) had history of broken skin and 36% (n = 4) had undergone treatment for venous leg ulcers. The most common co-morbidities were hypertension 55% (n = 6), deep vein thrombosis (DVT) 27% (n = 3), hypercholesterolemia 36% (n = 4) and type 2 diabetes 27% (n = 3). Quality of life scores identified that physical functioning was the domain most affected among this group. This study has identified the need to raise awareness of this condition among clinicians working in the area of wound management.
    • Understanding type 2 diabetes: including the family member's perspective.

      White, Patricia; Smith, Susan M; Hevey, David; O'Dowd, Thomas; Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Trinity College Centre for Health, Sciences, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's, Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. pwhite@tcd.ie (2012-02-01)
      PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.