• Fixation of ankle syndesmotic injuries: comparison of tightrope fixation and syndesmotic screw fixation for accuracy of syndesmotic reduction.

      Naqvi, Gohar A; Cunningham, Patricia; Lynch, Bernadette; Galvin, Rose; Awan, Nasir; Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Ireland. drgoharabbas@hotmail.com (2012-12)
      Ankle syndesmotic injuries are complex and require anatomic reduction and fixation to restore the normal biomechanics of the ankle joint and prevent long-term complications.
    • Glomus tumour of the thumb in a child with neurofibromatosis: a case report.

      Leonard, Michael; Harrington, Paul; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Our Lady of Lourdes, Drogheda, Ireland., mikeleonard77@gmail.com (2012-02-01)
      This case report is unique in reporting the occurrence of a glomus tumour in a child with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) and serves to support the link between neurofibromatosis-1 and glomus tumours.
    • Management of chronic symphysis pubis pain following child birth with spinal cord stimulator.

      Idrees, Ahsan; Department of Anaesthesia & Pain, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Ireland. (2012-01)
      The case of a 39 year old woman who had diastasis of pubic symphysis following childbirth and later developed severe chronic neuropathic pain and disability is presented. She received extensive surgical and medical treatment for 6 years with no improvement of symptoms. The VNRS (Visual Numerical Rating Scale) pain score was 7/10 or more most of the time. This was quite disabling in terms of her quality of life. A spinal cord stimulator was inserted after failure of other modalities of pain management which resulted in dramatic improvement in the quality of life measured with SF-36 questionnaire. Her pain score became 0/10 VNRS and she was free from opioids and psychotropic medications within 3 months post insertion. Spinal cord stimulator can be considered for the management of pain due to diastasis of pubic symphysis, not amenable to other therapies.
    • Minimally-invasive treatment of high velocity intra-articular fractures of the distal tibia.

      Leonard, M; Magill, P; Khayyat, G; Our Lady Of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Co. Louth, Ireland., mikeleonard77@gmail.com (2012-02-01)
      The pilon fracture is a complex injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of minimally invasive techniques in management of these injuries. This was a prospective study of closed AO type C2 and C3 fractures managed by early (<36 hours) minimally invasive surgical intervention and physiotherapist led rehabilitation. Thirty patients with 32 intra-articular distal tibial fractures were treated by the senior surgeon (GK). Our aim was to record the outcome and all complications with a minimum two year follow-up. There were two superficial wound infections. One patient developed a non-union which required a formal open procedure. Another patient was symptomatic from a palpable plate inferiorly. An excellent AOFAS result was obtained in 83% (20/24) of the patients. Early minimally invasive reduction and fixation of complex high velocity pilon fractures gave very satisfactory results at a minimum of two years follow-up.
    • Necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity: a case report and current concept of diagnosis and management.

      Naqvi, G A; Malik, S A; Jan, W; Department of Orthopaedics, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Republic of, Ireland. drgoharabbas@hotmail.com (2012-02-01)
      Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly progressing necrosis, involving subcutaneous tissues. This rare condition carries high mortality rate and require prompt diagnosis and urgent treatment with radical debridement and antibiotics. We describe a case of 21-year old man who presented with the history of trivial injury to the knee. Initially he was admitted and treated for septic arthritis but later was diagnosed as necrotizing fasciitis which was successfully treated with no ill effects what so ever from this devastating condition. This rare condition has been reported in literature but still early diagnosis, which is a key for successful treatment, remains a challenge.
    • Peripheral nerve field stimulation for pruritus relief in a patient with notalgia paraesthetica.

      Ricciardo, Bernadette; Kumar, Sandeep; O'Callaghan, James; Boyce, Zachary; Department of Dermatology, Our Lady Of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Louth,, Ireland. berniricciardo@yahoo.com.au (2012-02-01)
      This case study is presented to exemplify the application of peripheral nerve field stimulation in the treatment of recalcitrant notalgia paraesthetica. The patient was a 60-year-old woman with severe and disabling notalgia paraesthetica. The itch persisted despite the use of several medications - topical and oral. Following a successful trial of peripheral nerve field stimulation with a temporary electrode, two subcutaneous electrodes were inserted into the affected area with a battery implanted subcutaneously in her right buttock. The patient was reviewed at 5 months post implantation. She reported a greater than 85% improvement in her itch. She also reported a major improvement in her quality of life, with particular improvement in her ability to sleep through the night. This case illustrates the possible utilization of peripheral nerve field stimulation in the treatment of notalgia paraesthetica, which is a common yet poorly understood and treated condition. Replication and controlled studies are required to determine the general applicability of this approach.
    • Reversal of Hartmann's procedure following acute diverticulitis: is timing everything?

      Fleming, Fergal J; Gillen, Peter; Surgical Professorial Unit, Department of Surgery, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, , Drogheda, Co Louth, Ireland. fjfleming@rcsi.ie (2012-02-01)
      BACKGROUND: Patients who undergo a Hartmann's procedure may not be offered a reversal due to concerns over the morbidity of the second procedure. The aims of this study were to examine the morbidity post reversal of Hartmann's procedure. METHODS: Patients who underwent a Hartmann's procedure for acute diverticulitis (Hinchey 3 or 4) between 1995 and 2006 were studied. Clinical factors including patient comorbidities were analysed to elucidate what preoperative factors were associated with complications following reversal of Hartmann's procedure. RESULTS: One hundred and ten patients were included. Median age was 70 years and 56% of the cohort were male (n = 61). The mortality and morbidity rate for the acute presentation was 7.3% (n = 8) and 34% (n = 37) respectively. Seventy six patients (69%) underwent a reversal at a median of 7 months (range 3-22 months) post-Hartmann's procedure. The complication rate in the reversal group was 25% (n = 18). A history of current smoking (p = 0.004), increasing time to reversal (p = 0.04) and low preoperative albumin (p = 0.003) were all associated with complications following reversal. CONCLUSIONS: Reversal of Hartmann's procedure can be offered to appropriately selected patients though with a significant (25%) morbidity rate. The identification of potential modifiable factors such as current smoking, prolonged time to reversal and low preoperative albumin may allow optimisation of such patients preoperatively.
    • Tightrope fixation of ankle syndesmosis injuries: clinical outcome, complications and technique modification.

      Naqvi, Gohar A; Shafqat, Aseer; Awan, Nasir; Department of Orthopaedics, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Ireland. drgoharabbas@hotmail.com (2012-06)
      Ankle syndesmotic injuries are complex and require anatomic reduction and fixation. Tightrope fixation is a relatively new technique and we present the largest series of syndesmosis fixation using Arthrex Tightrope™ (Naples, FL, USA).