• A case of congenital solitary Langerhans cell histiocytoma.

      Ricciardo, Bernadette; Irvine, Alan; McDermott, Michael; Ryan, John; Collins, Sinead; Department of Dermatology, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Dublin,, Ireland. berniricciardo@yahoo.com.au (2012-02-01)
      A newborn baby boy was referred to the Paediatric Dermatology Unit with a solitary asymptomatic nodule overlying his right nasolabial fold. Complete physical examination, full blood count, serum chemistry, liver function tests and baseline imaging were unremarkable. Histopathological examination showed an atypical dermal infiltrate of mononuclear cells that stained positive with CD1a and S100. A diagnosis of congenital solitary Langerhans cell histiocytoma was made. The lesion completely resolved by 4 months of age. The baby is now 15 months old and repeat systemic evaluation has remained normal.
    • Irish neonatal mortality statistics for 2004 and over the past 17 years: how do we compare internationally?

      Fleming, P; Clarke, T; Gormally, S M; Department of Neonatology and Paediatrics, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital,, Drogheda, Co Louth. (2012-02-01)
      In the past 17 years neonatal mortality survey has provided important data on the trends in deaths of all live born infants born in Southern Ireland who are greater than 500 g birth weight and who die within the first 28 days of life. The aims of this study were to report neonatal mortality data for Southern Ireland for 2004, to examine trends in neonatal mortality over the past 17 years and compare Irish Neonatal Mortality rates to other countries around the world. The neonatal mortality rate for 2004 was 2.9/1000 with a corrected NMR of 1.9/1000. The response rate to the survey was 100%. Prematurity is now the leading cause of neonatal mortality representing a change from previous years. Deaths related to asphyxia have remained largely unchanged. When compared to international figures Ireland compares favourably to other countries around the world.
    • Modes of death in neonatal intensive care units.

      Finan, E; Bolger, T; Gormally, S M; Dept of Neonatology, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Co. Louth. (2006-04)
      With the ever-increasing availability of aggressive medical treatment and technical support, neonatologists are offered an increasing ability to prolong life. While "end-of-life" decisions within NICUs have been studied internationally, there is limited data available for Ireland. Through the auspices of the Irish Faculty of Paediatrics 2002 Neonatal Mortality Ouestionnaire, decisions made around the time of death in Irish Neonatal Intensive Care Units were examined. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 96% (n=25). One hundred and eighty seven deaths were reported for 2002. Information pertaining to the mode of death was available in 53% of cases. Seventy seven percent of those paediatricians who answered this question, reported either withdrawing or withholding treatment in babies thought to have a hopeless outcome, with the greatest proportion of these deaths occurring in premature infants (n=30) and babies with congenital defects (n=40).