• Undiagnosed coeliac disease in a father does not influence birthweight and preterm birth.

      Khashan, Ali S; Kenny, Louise C; McNamee, Roseanne; Mortensen, Preben B; Pedersen, Marianne G; McCarthy, Fergus P; Henriksen, Tine B; Anu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College, Cork, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Ireland. a.khashan@ucc.ie (2012-01-31)
      There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of coeliac disease (CD) in the father on birthweight and preterm birth. We investigated the association between paternal CD and birthweight and preterm birth. Medical records of all singleton live-born children in Denmark between 1 January 1979 and 31 December 2004 were linked to information about parents' diseases. Fathers who were diagnosed with CD were then identified. Fathers with CD were considered treated if they were diagnosed before pregnancy and untreated if they were diagnosed after the date of conception. The outcome measures were: birthweight, small-for-gestational age (birthweight<10th centile for gestational age) and preterm birth (<37 weeks). We compared the offspring of men without CD (n = 1 472 352) and offspring of those with CD [untreated (n = 138) and treated (n = 473)]. There was no significant association between untreated CD in the father and birthweight (adjusted mean difference = -3 g; [95% CI -46, 40]) or preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.86, [95% CI 0.53, 1.37]) (compared with no CD). There was some evidence for an association between treated paternal CD and birthweight (adjusted mean difference = -81 g; [95% CI -161, -3]), but not preterm birth (adjusted OR = 1.76, [95% CI 0.95, 3.26]). Untreated paternal CD was not associated with an increased risk of reduced birthweight, or of preterm birth. There was some evidence that diagnosis and presumed treatment of paternal CD with a gluten-free diet is associated with reduced birthweight.
    • Uptake of newly introduced universal BCG vaccination in newborns.

      Braima, O; Rigney, A; Ryan, C A; Murphy, C; Department of Neonatology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork. (2012-01-31)
      Universal neonatal BCG vaccination was discontinued in Cork in 1972. Following an outbreak of TB in 2 creches in the HSE South, a universal BCG vaccination program was re-introduced in October 2008. The aim of this study was to determine the vaccination process (in-hospital and community) and the in-hospital uptake of the vaccine. Following informed parental consent, babies of birth weight > 2.5 Kg were eligible for in-hospital vaccination if they were not: febrile, jaundiced on phototherapy, on antibiotics and if not born to HIV- positive mothers. Parents of babies not vaccinated in-hospital were asked to book an appointment in either of the 2 Cork community clinics. The immunisation nurse collected data on BCG vaccination, prospectively. This study examined vaccination uptakes in-hospital and community over a 6 month period (October 2008 to March 2009). There were 4018 deliveries during the study period. In-hospital consent was declined in only 16 babies (<1%) while the in-hospital vaccination uptake was 80% of total liv births. Although 635 newborns were admitted to the NICU, only 46 (8%) were vaccinated while in the NICU. At least 48% of planned community vaccination has been achieved to date. In conclusion, in-hospital consent was almost universal and vaccination uptake was satisfactory. NICU exclusion criteria accounted for a significant proportion of non-vaccination in-hospital. These criteria need to be readdressed considering that all premature babies are given other routine newborn vaccines at 2 months of age, regardless of weight.
    • The use of conventional EEG for the assessment of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in the newborn: a review.

      Walsh, B H; Murray, D M; Boylan, G B; Neonatal Brain Research Group, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork, , Ireland. (2012-01-31)
      Neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy continues to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among neonates around the globe. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, the need to accurately classify the severity of injury in the early neonatal period is of great importance. As clinical measures cannot always accurately estimate the severity early enough for treatment to be initiated, clinicians have become more dependent on conventional and amplitude integrated EEG. Despite this, there is currently no single agreed classification scheme for the neonatal EEG in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. In this review we discuss classification schemes of neonatal background EEG, published over the past 35 years, highlighting the urgent need for a universal visual analysis scheme.
    • The use of conventional EEG for the assessment of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in the newborn: a review.

      Walsh, B H; Murray, D M; Boylan, G B; Neonatal Brain Research Group, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. (2011-07)
      Neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy continues to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among neonates around the globe. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, the need to accurately classify the severity of injury in the early neonatal period is of great importance. As clinical measures cannot always accurately estimate the severity early enough for treatment to be initiated, clinicians have become more dependent on conventional and amplitude integrated EEG. Despite this, there is currently no single agreed classification scheme for the neonatal EEG in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. In this review we discuss classification schemes of neonatal background EEG, published over the past 35 years, highlighting the urgent need for a universal visual analysis scheme.
    • Using smart phone technology to teach neonatal endotracheal intubation (NeoTube): application development and uptake.

      Hawkes, Colin Patrick; Hanotin, Stefan; O'Flaherty, Brian; Woodworth, Simon; Ryan, C Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene Michael; Department of Neonatology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University College Cork, Cork,, Ireland Department of Business Information Systems, University College Cork,, Cork, Ireland. (2012-01-31)
    • Women's experience of maternal morbidity: a qualitative analysis.

      Meaney, S; Lutomski, J E; O' Connor, L; O' Donoghue, K; Greene, R A (BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 2016-07)
      Maternal morbidity refers to pregnancy-related complications, ranging in severity from acute to chronic. In Ireland one in 210 maternities will experience a severe morbidity. Yet, how women internalize their experience of morbidity has gone largely unexplored. This study aimed to explore women's experiences of maternal morbidity.