• Infection following cerebrospinal fluid shunt insertion in the Republic of Ireland A retrospective audit

      Burns, K; Caird, J; Allcut, D; Sattar, MTA; Crimmins, D; Gavin, P; Butler, K; Cafferkey, M; Cunney, R (2011-06)
      ESPID 29th Annual Meeting June 2011
    • Infection following external ventricular drain insertion in the Republic of Ireland

      Gavin, P; Butler, K; Cafferkey, M; Cunney, R; Burns, K; Caird, J; Allcut, D; Sattar, MTA; Crimmins, D (2011-06)
      ESPID 29th Annual Meeting
    • Multiplex PCR to determine Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes causing otitis media in the Republic of Ireland with further characterisation of antimicrobial susceptibilities and genotypes.

      Vickers, I; O'Flanagan, D; Cafferkey, M; Humphreys, H; Epidemiology and Molecular Biology Unit and Irish Meningococcal and Meningitis Reference Laboratory, Children's University Hospital, Temple St., Dublin, Ireland. imelda.vickers@cuh.ie (2011-03)
      The purpose of this study was to determine the serotypes, genotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing otitis media (OM) in children in Dublin, Ireland. S. pneumoniae isolates (n = 28) from spontaneously discharging OM were studied. Serotyping was performed using a previously undescribed multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) scheme in combination with serological methods. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed using standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Etest method. Fourteen different S. pneumoniae serotypes were identified. The five most common serotypes were 3, 19F, 19A, 14 and 6A, which accounted for 68% of all infections. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) provided potential coverages of 43%, 46% and 86%, respectively. Reduced susceptibility to penicillin was evident for 25% of isolates and was associated with serotypes 14, 19A, 19F and 9V. A total of 21 different sequence types (STs) were identified. Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN) clones or their variants represented 54% (15/28) of all isolates. Continued monitoring and characterisation of S. pneumoniae causing OM in Ireland is warranted in order to guide future vaccine and treatment policies.
    • A pilot newborn screening programme for Congenital Toxoplasmosis in the Republic of Ireland

      Mayne, PD; Finnegan, N; Ferguson, W; Guy, E; Bulter, K; Cafferkey, M (2009-04)
    • Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical outcomes in a pre-vaccine era at a Dublin paediatric hospital, 1999-2007.

      Lucey, J M; Gavin, P; Cafferkey, M; Butler, K M; Department of Paediatrics, Children's University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin 1, Ireland. Juliette.Lucey@health.wa.gov.au (2011-03)
      To document the long-term outcomes of pneumococcal meningitis in children presenting to a Dublin paediatric hospital in the pre-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) era (1998-2007).
    • Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

      Vickers, I; Fitzgerald, M; Murchan, S; Cotter, S; O'Flanagan, D; Cafferkey, M; Humphreys, H; Epidemiology and Molecular Biology Unit and Irish Meningococcal and Meningitis Reference Laboratory, Children's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. imelda.vickers@cuh.ie (2011-05)
      The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.
    • Should children with inherited metabolic disorders receive varicella vaccination?

      Varghese, M; Cafferkey, M; O'Regan, M; Monavari, A A; Treacy, E P; National Centre for Inherited Metabolic Disorders, Children's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. (2011-01)
      The aim was to determine the rate of varicella infection and complications in children with disorders of intermediary metabolism (IEM) between the ages of 1 and 16 years attending our national metabolic referral centre. Of 126 children identified, a response was received from 122. A history of previous varicella infection was identified in 64 cases (53%) and of varicella vaccination in 5 (4%). Fifty-three (43%) patients apparently did not have a history of clinical varicella infection. Of the 64 children with a history of varicella infection, five required hospitalisation for complications, including life-threatening lactic acidosis in one patient with mitochondrial disease and metabolic decompensation in four patients. In conclusion, varicella infection may cause an increased risk of metabolic decompensation in patients with IEMs. We propose that a trial of varicella vaccination be considered for this cohort of patients with monitoring of its safety and efficacy.