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dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, D
dc.contributor.authorRichards, J
dc.contributor.authorWalton, K E
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, M G A
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, H
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-06T14:06:14Z
dc.date.available2011-04-06T14:06:14Z
dc.date.issued2009-10
dc.identifier.citationSurvey of teaching/learning of healthcare-associated infections in UK and Irish medical schools. 2009, 73 (2):171-5 J. Hosp. Infect.en
dc.identifier.issn1532-2939
dc.identifier.pmid19709777
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jhin.2009.07.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127465
dc.description.abstractAll medical doctors have an important role to play in the diagnosis, management and prevention of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI). Strengthening the contribution of medical doctors and medical students to HCAI prevention programmes should include measures that enhance knowledge, improve practice and develop appropriate attitudes to the safety and quality of patient care. The Hospital Infection Society (HIS) funded a review of medical education on HCAI throughout medical schools in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. A questionnaire was drafted and circulated to all medical schools and 31 of 38 (82%) responded. The prevalence and transmission of HCAI were taught by 97% and 100% of medical schools, respectively, but the importance of HCAI as a quality and safety issue was covered in only 60% of medical schools. Multiple choice questions (MCQs) and objective structure clinical examinations (OSCEs) were the most popular methods of assessment. Lectures, discussion of cases and practical demonstrations were considered useful by >90% of respondents and online material and log books by 67% and 60%, respectively. More than 80% were willing to share a common pool of educational resources. An agreed curriculum should be developed for educating medical students in HCAI prevention and control, to outline optimum methods for assessment and develop a shared pool of educational resources.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCross Infection
dc.subject.meshCurriculum
dc.subject.meshData Collection
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduate
dc.subject.meshEducational Measurement
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.subject.meshSchools, Medical
dc.subject.meshTeaching
dc.titleSurvey of teaching/learning of healthcare-associated infections in UK and Irish medical schools.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology, Beaumont Hospital, and Department of Clinical Microbiology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of hospital infectionen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractAll medical doctors have an important role to play in the diagnosis, management and prevention of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI). Strengthening the contribution of medical doctors and medical students to HCAI prevention programmes should include measures that enhance knowledge, improve practice and develop appropriate attitudes to the safety and quality of patient care. The Hospital Infection Society (HIS) funded a review of medical education on HCAI throughout medical schools in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. A questionnaire was drafted and circulated to all medical schools and 31 of 38 (82%) responded. The prevalence and transmission of HCAI were taught by 97% and 100% of medical schools, respectively, but the importance of HCAI as a quality and safety issue was covered in only 60% of medical schools. Multiple choice questions (MCQs) and objective structure clinical examinations (OSCEs) were the most popular methods of assessment. Lectures, discussion of cases and practical demonstrations were considered useful by >90% of respondents and online material and log books by 67% and 60%, respectively. More than 80% were willing to share a common pool of educational resources. An agreed curriculum should be developed for educating medical students in HCAI prevention and control, to outline optimum methods for assessment and develop a shared pool of educational resources.


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