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dc.contributor.authorBrown, C M
dc.contributor.authorAbraham, K A
dc.contributor.authorO'Kelly, P
dc.contributor.authorConlon, P J
dc.contributor.authorWalshe, J J
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-05T14:31:08Z
dc.date.available2011-04-05T14:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2009-11
dc.identifier.citationLong-term experience of plasmapheresis in antibody-mediated rejection in renal transplantation. 2009, 41 (9):3690-2 Transplant. Proc.en
dc.identifier.issn1873-2623
dc.identifier.pmid19917368
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.06.197
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/127202
dc.description.abstractAntibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to pose a serious challenge in renal transplantation with potentially devastating consequences. Treatment options for this condition include plasmapheresis, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis with low-dose IVIG, and the use of rituximab (anti-CD20 chimeric antibody). We previously reported on the short-term outcome of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR in our centre. We now report on the long-term follow up.
dc.description.abstractOver a 2.5-year study period, 440 cadaveric transplants were performed. AMR developed in 20 (4.5%) patients. Treatment included plasmapheresis and intensification of their immunosuppressive therapy.
dc.description.abstractExcluding two patients who had infarcted their grafts at diagnosis, 18 patients received plasmapheresis treatment for AMR. Of the 18 patients treated, 14 recovered function, two developed graft infarction within a fortnight of starting plasmapheresis, and two patients were withdrawn from treatment. In the 14 who recovered renal function, graft survival was 86% at 12 months. In this study we report on the 5-year follow-up of these AMR-treatment responders. Eleven patients have a functioning graft at 5 years; graft function was stable with a mean serum creatinine of 130 micromol/L at 5 years compared to 123 mumol/L at 1 year. At 5-years follow-up; graft survival was 78% and patient survival 93%.
dc.description.abstractLittle information is available in the literature regarding the long-term outcome of this therapy. This is the first report on the long-term (5-year) follow-up of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived
dc.subject.meshCadaver
dc.subject.meshCreatinine
dc.subject.meshGraft Rejection
dc.subject.meshGraft Survival
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulins, Intravenous
dc.subject.meshImmunosuppressive Agents
dc.subject.meshIsoantibodies
dc.subject.meshKidney Transplantation
dc.subject.meshPlasmapheresis
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate
dc.subject.meshTissue Donors
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.titleLong-term experience of plasmapheresis in antibody-mediated rejection in renal transplantation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Nephrology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. catherinebrownis@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalTransplantation proceedingsen
dc.description.provinceLeinster
html.description.abstractAntibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to pose a serious challenge in renal transplantation with potentially devastating consequences. Treatment options for this condition include plasmapheresis, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis with low-dose IVIG, and the use of rituximab (anti-CD20 chimeric antibody). We previously reported on the short-term outcome of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR in our centre. We now report on the long-term follow up.
html.description.abstractOver a 2.5-year study period, 440 cadaveric transplants were performed. AMR developed in 20 (4.5%) patients. Treatment included plasmapheresis and intensification of their immunosuppressive therapy.
html.description.abstractExcluding two patients who had infarcted their grafts at diagnosis, 18 patients received plasmapheresis treatment for AMR. Of the 18 patients treated, 14 recovered function, two developed graft infarction within a fortnight of starting plasmapheresis, and two patients were withdrawn from treatment. In the 14 who recovered renal function, graft survival was 86% at 12 months. In this study we report on the 5-year follow-up of these AMR-treatment responders. Eleven patients have a functioning graft at 5 years; graft function was stable with a mean serum creatinine of 130 micromol/L at 5 years compared to 123 mumol/L at 1 year. At 5-years follow-up; graft survival was 78% and patient survival 93%.
html.description.abstractLittle information is available in the literature regarding the long-term outcome of this therapy. This is the first report on the long-term (5-year) follow-up of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR.


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