• Alcohol-attributable mortality in Ireland.

      Martin, Jennifer; Barry, Joe; Goggin, Deirdre; Morgan, Karen; Ward, Mark; O'Suilleabhain, Tadhg; Department of Public Health, Merlin Park, Galway, Ireland. Jennifer.martin@hse.ie (2010)
      The study aim was to calculate Irish alcohol-attributable fractions (AAFs) and to apply these measurements to existing data in order to quantify the impact of alcohol on mortality.
    • Clofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia.

      Krawczyk, Janusz; Ansar, Naeem; Swords, Ronan; Murphy, Tracy; MacDonagh, Barry; Meenaghan, Teresa; Hayden, Patrick; Hayad, Amjad; Murray, Margaret; O'Dwyer, Michael; et al. (2010-09)
      Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.
    • Day-case tonsillectomy: practical solution or practical impossibility.

      Kharytaniuk, N; Ali, R; Sharafa, A; Keogh, I J (Irish Medical Journal, 2015-01)
      The use of day case surgery is on the rise. In order to improve efficiency and reduce cost, it has been proposed that tonsillectomy could be undertaken as a day-case procedure in Ireland. A retrospective, chart-based study was carried out. The medical and social criteria of all patients who underwent tonsillectomy during a twelve-month period were evaluated. Individual, local and national factors were identified and international comparisons were made. Of 161 patients included, 43 (27%) were considered suitable for day case tonsillectomy (DCT). The distance/time criteria from hospital excluded 64% of patients. The diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea was the single most common medical reason for exclusion. Support structures were deficient. Local factors must be considered before any policy or targets are developed for DCT. Patient safety is the fundamental tenet. Currently, the infrastructure and the support required for a patient-focused, safe efficient DCT are deficient, and need investment.
    • Demographics, nature and treatment of orthopaedic trauma injuries occurring in an agricultural context in the West of Ireland.

      Byrne, F J; Waters, P S; Waters, S M; Hynes, S; Ní Thuairisg, C P; O'Sullivan, M; Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Merlin Park Hospital, Galway, Ireland. fergbyrne@gmail.com (2011-03)
      Farming is a major industry in the West of Ireland. This prospective study examined the age profile, nature and treatment of orthopaedic injuries occurring in agricultural surroundings presenting at the Orthopaedic Unit of Merlin Park Hospital, Galway.
    • Double paddle free fibular flap for reconstruction of the composite facial tumour in patient with Fanconi's anaemia.

      Alkaabi, Malaka; Regan, Padraic J; Kelly, Jack; Mc Cann, Patrick J; Ismael, Thamir S (2009-11)
    • Illness representations in patients with hand injury.

      Chan, Jeffrey C Y; Ong, Joshua C Y; Avalos, Gloria; Regan, Padraic J; McCann, Jack; Groarke, AnnMarie; Kelly, John L; Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway, Newcastle Road, Galway, Ireland. chancy@eircom.net (2009-07)
      Differences in illness perception about hand injury may partly explain the variation in health behaviours such as adherence to post-operative therapy, coping strategy, emotional response and eventual clinical outcome. This study examined the illness perception of patients with hand injuries in the acute trauma setting.
    • Randomized controlled trial of the Pentax AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh laryngoscopes in predicted difficult intubation.

      Malik, M A; Subramaniam, R; Maharaj, C H; Harte, B H; Laffey, J G; Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland. (2009-11)
      The purpose of this study was to determine the potential for the Pentax AWS and the Glidescope to reduce the difficulty of tracheal intubation in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomized, controlled clinical trial.
    • Stereology of human myometrium in pregnancy: influence of maternal body mass index and age.

      Sweeney, Eva M; Crankshaw, Denis J; O'Brien, Yvonne; Dockery, Peter; Morrison, John J; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. (2013-04)
      Knowledge of the stereology of human myometrium in pregnancy is limited. Uterine contractile performance may be altered in association with maternal obesity and advanced maternal age. The aim of this study was to investigate the stereology of human myometrium in pregnancy, and to evaluate a potential influence of maternal body mass index (BMI) and age.
    • Supraclavicular scalenectomy for thoracic outlet syndrome--functional outcomes assessed using the DASH scoring system.

      Glynn, Ronan W; Tawfick, Wael; Elsafty, Zahrah; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, Galway University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. (2012-02)
      To evaluate supraclavicular scalenectomy ± cervical rib excision for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), employing Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scoring for functional assessment post-decompression.
    • Sustained weight loss and improvement of quality of life after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding for morbid obesity: a single surgeon experience in Ireland.

      Chang, K H; Condon, E T; O'Connor, E J; McAnena, O J; Department of Surgery, Galway University Hospital, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland. kahhoong_chang@yahoo.co.uk (2010-03)
      Although substantial weight loss is the primary outcome following bariatric surgery, changes in obesity-related morbidity and quality of life (QoL) are equally important. This study reports on weight loss, QoL and health outcomes following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB).
    • Tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: a comparison of the Airwayscope, LMA CTrach, and the Macintosh laryngoscopes.

      Malik, M A; Subramaniam, R; Churasia, S; Maharaj, C H; Harte, B H; Laffey, J G; Department of Anaesthesia, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland. (2009-05)
      The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pentax AWS, and the LMA CTrach, in comparison with the Macintosh laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilization using manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilization.
    • Young adult type 1 diabetes care in the West of Ireland: an audit of hospital practice.

      Casey, R; O'Hara, M C; Cunningham, A; Wall, D; Geoghegan, R; Hynes, L; McGuire, B; Gately, M; Bell, M; Dinneen, S F (Oxford University Press, 2014-11)
      It is well recognised that management of young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) poses difficult challenges for physicians and health care organisations as a whole. In Ireland and in particular the west of Ireland there has been little audit or research on young adults with T1DM and the services available to them.