• Does topical wound oxygen (TWO2) offer an improved outcome over conventional compression dressings (CCD) in the management of refractory venous ulcers (RVU)? A parallel observational comparative study.

      Tawfick, W; Sultan, S; Western Vascular Institute (WVI), Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University College Hospital Galway (UCHG), Galway, Ireland. wael.tawfick@hse.ie (European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery, 2009-07)
      Topical wound oxygen (TWO(2)) may help wound healing in the management of refractory venous ulcers (RVU). The aim of this study was to measure the effect of TWO(2) on wound healing using the primary end-point of the proportion of ulcers healed at 12 weeks. Secondary end-points were time to full healing, percentage of reduction in ulcer size, pain reduction, recurrence rates and Quality-Adjusted Time Spent Without Symptoms of disease and Toxicity of Treatment (Q-TWiST).
    • Double paddle free fibular flap for reconstruction of the composite facial tumour in patient with Fanconi's anaemia.

      Alkaabi, Malaka; Regan, Padraic J; Kelly, Jack; Mc Cann, Patrick J; Ismael, Thamir S (2009-11)
    • Five years' experience of transverse groin incision for femoral artery access in arterial reconstructive surgery: parallel observational longitudinal group comparison study.

      Beirne, Christopher; Martin, Fiachra; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, University College Hospital Galway, Galway, Ireland. (Vascular, 2008-07)
      Vertical groin incisions (VGIs) have been used to access femoral vessels, but reports allude to wound complications. Our aim was to compare VGI with transverse groin incision (TGI) for femoral artery exposure. Over a 5-year interval, 196 patients with 284 femoral artery exposures for supra- and infrainguinal procedures were studied. Primary endpoints were surgical skin site wound infection, seroma, haematoma formation, and major lower limb amputation. Secondary endpoints were graft patency, wound paresthesias, and length of hospital stay. There were 160 TGIs and 124 VGIs. The demographics and risk factor profile were not statistically different between groups. Seroma developed in 4.4% of TGIs and 13.7% of VGIs (p= .005). The complicated skin and soft tissue infection rate was five times greater with VGI (p= .001). The VGI group had a significantly higher rate of major amputation (p= .0005). Significantly higher graft failure rates were observed in the VGI group (p= .011). No paresthesia was reported in any TGI wound. The mean hospital stay was also significantly shorter in the TGI group (p= .006). The study data support and expound on the theory that an alternative incision to VGI offers lower short- and long-term morbidity. Our findings sustain the selection of the TGI in femoral artery surgery for both supra- and infrainguinal procedures without compromise of vessel exposure.
    • Hydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates.

      Martin, Fiachra T; O'Sullivan, John B; Regan, Padraic J; McCann, Jack; Kelly, Jack L; Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. fiachra1978@yahoo.com (2010-03)
      Partial-thickness scalds are the most common pediatric burn injury, and primary management consists of wound dressings to optimize the environment for reepithelialization. Operative intervention is reserved for burns that fail to heal using conservative methods. Worldwide, paraffin-based gauze (Jelonet) is the most common burn dressing; but literature suggests that it adheres to wounds and requires more frequent dressing change that may traumatize newly epithelialized surfaces. Hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM) provide an occlusive moist environment to optimize healing and are associated with less frequent dressing changes.
    • Sequential compression biomechanical device in patients with critical limb ischemia and nonreconstructible peripheral vascular disease.

      Sultan, Sherif; Hamada, Nader; Soylu, Esraa; Fahy, Anne; Hynes, Niamh; Tawfick, Wael; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, University College Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sherif.sultan@hse.ie (Journal of vascular surgery, 2011-08)
      Critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients who are unsuitable for intervention face the dire prospect of primary amputation. Sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) therapy provides a limb salvage option for these patients. This study assessed the outcome of SCBD in severe CLI patients who otherwise would face an amputation. Primary end points were limb salvage and 30-day mortality. Secondary end points were hemodynamic outcomes (increase in popliteal artery flow and toe pressure), ulcer healing, quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity of treatment (Q-TwiST), and cost-effectiveness.