• The effects of normalizing hyperhomocysteinemia on clinical and operative outcomes in patients with critical limb ischemia.

      Waters, Peadar S; Fennessey, Paul J; Hynes, Niamh; Heneghan, Helen M; Tawfick, Wael; Sultan, Sherif; Western Vascular Institute, University College Hospital Galway, Ireland. (Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists, 2012-12)
      To assess the outcome of patients with medically treated hyperhomocysteinemia (HHC) requiring intervention for critical limb ischemia (CLI).
    • Homocysteine, the cholesterol of the 21st century. Impact of hyperhomocysteinemia on patency and amputation-free survival after intervention for critical limb ischemia.

      Heneghan, Helen M; Sultan, Sherif; Western Vascular Institute, Department of Vascular & Endovascular Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway, Ireland. (Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists, 2008-08)
      To assess the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia and determine any correlation to the clinical and technical outcome of peripheral arterial revascularization for critical limb ischemia (CLI).
    • Isolated pharmacomechanical thrombolysis plus primary stenting in a single procedure to treat acute thrombotic superior vena cava syndrome.

      O'Sullivan, Gerard J; Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Ferguson, David; Delappe, Eithne; O'Riordan, Conor; Browne, Ann Michelle; Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, and, University College Hospital, Newcastle Road, Galway, Ireland. gerard.osullivan2@hse.ie (Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists, 2010-02)
      To report a combined procedure that opens the acutely thrombosed superior vena cava (SVC) to rapidly alleviate symptoms in seriously ill patients with SVC syndrome.
    • Patients on hemodialysis are better served by a proximal arteriovenous fistula for long-term venous access.

      Sultan, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh; Hamada, Nader; Tawfick, Wael; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, Galway University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sherif.sultan@hse.ie (2012-11)
      Patients with end-stage renal disease should have arteriovenous fistula (AVF) formation 3 to 6 months prior to commencing hemodialysis (HD). However, this is not always possible with strained health care resources. We aim to compare autologous proximal AVF (PAVF) with distal AVF (DAVF) in patients already on HD. Primary end point is 4-year functional primary. Secondary end point is freedom from major adverse clinical events (MACEs). From January 2003 to June 2009, out of 495 AVF formations, 179 (36%) patients were already on HD. These patients had 200 AVF formations (49 DAVF vs 151 PAVF) in arms in which no previous fistula had been formed. No synthetic graft was used. Four-year primary functional patency significantly improved with PAVF (68.9% ± SD 8.8%) compared to DAVF (7.3% ± SD 4.9%; P < .0001). Five-year freedom from MACE was 85% with PAVF compared to 40% with DAVF (P < .005). Proximal AVF bestows long-term functional access with fewer complications compared to DAVF for patients already on HD.
    • Salvage of critical limb ischemia with the "trellis reserve'' of subintimal superficial femoral-popliteal artery occlusion: a new modality in managing critical limb ischemia--a case report.

      Sultan, Sherif; Heskin, Leonie; Hynes, Niamh; Akhtar, Yousaf; Cough, Val; Manning, Brian; Aremu, M; Courtney, D; Western Vascular Institute, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University College Hospital Galway, Ireland. sherifsultan@esatclear.ie (Vascular and endovascular surgery, 2005)
      Subintimal angioplasty is a safe, effective, but nondurable procedure in treating long superficial femoral artery occlusions in patients with severe lower limb ischemia. The authors report a case of acute thrombosis that presented 16 weeks after subintimal angioplasty. The ;;Trellis'' percutaneous thrombolytic infusion system permitted a controlled site-specific infusion of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA). The unique design of the ;;Trellis'' allowed complete aspiration of thrombus and avoiding regional and systemic thrombolytic side effects. The ;;Trellis'' system is effective in percutaneous management of thrombotic lesions; however, intimal dissection may need to be addressed.