• Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

      Gorman, J; Vellinga, A; Gilmartin, J J; O'Keeffe, S T; Regional Health Office, Merlin Park University Hospital, HSE West, Galway, Ireland. (2010-06)
      Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).
    • Hydrocolloid dressing in pediatric burns may decrease operative intervention rates.

      Martin, Fiachra T; O'Sullivan, John B; Regan, Padraic J; McCann, Jack; Kelly, Jack L; Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. fiachra1978@yahoo.com (2010-03)
      Partial-thickness scalds are the most common pediatric burn injury, and primary management consists of wound dressings to optimize the environment for reepithelialization. Operative intervention is reserved for burns that fail to heal using conservative methods. Worldwide, paraffin-based gauze (Jelonet) is the most common burn dressing; but literature suggests that it adheres to wounds and requires more frequent dressing change that may traumatize newly epithelialized surfaces. Hydrocolloid dressings (DuoDERM) provide an occlusive moist environment to optimize healing and are associated with less frequent dressing changes.
    • Implementation of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S) in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: an observational comparative cohort study.

      Tawfick, Wael A; O'Connor, Martina; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Western Vascular Institute, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway, Newcastle RD, Galway, Ireland. (Vascular and endovascular surgery, 2008)
      The use of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S; Fresenius Hemotechnology, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany), which conserves allogenic blood, is reported in 187 patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm repair during a 9-year period. Patients were allocated to C.A.T.S if a Haemovigilance technician was available. A mean of 685 mL of retrieved blood was reinfused in 101 patients receiving C.A.T.S; 61% required 2 U or less. All control patients required 3 U or more of allogenic blood. Allogenic transfusion in C.A.T.S patients decreased significantly (P < .0001). Mean intensive care unit stay was significantly reduced in C.A.T.S patients (P = .042). Mean postoperative hospital stay was 18 days for C.A.T.S group and 25 days in control patients (P = .014). The respective 30-day mortality was 12% versus 19% (P = .199). The C.A.T.S markedly reduced the amount of blood transfused, was associated with reduced intensive care unit and postoperative hospital stay, and was cost-effective.
    • Orientation to time as a guide to the presence and severity of cognitive impairment in older hospital patients.

      O'Keeffe, Emma; Mukhtar, Osman; O'Keeffe, Shaun T; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Unit 4, Merlin Park University Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sokanc@iolfree.ie (2011-05)
      Testing of orientation to time is an important part of mental status examination. The validity of errors in different aspects of temporal orientation was examined in older hospital patients as a guide to the presence of dementia or delirium and as a measure of the severity of dementia, as defined by the Global Deterioration Scale.
    • Review of acute cancer beds.

      Evans, D S; Kiernan, R; Corcoran, R; Glacken, M; O'Shea, M; Department of Public Health, HSE West, Merlin Park Hospital, Galway. (Irish Medical Journal (IMJ), 2012-01)
      A review of admissions to cancer services at University Hospital Galway (UHG) was undertaken to assess the appropriateness of hospital usage. All cancer specialty patients admitted from 26-28 May 2009 were reviewed (n = 82). Chi square tests, Exact tests, and One-way ANOVA were utilised to analyse key issues emerging from the data. Fifty (61%) were classified as emergencies. Twenty three (67%) occupied a designated cancer bed with 24 (30%) in outlying non-oncology wards. The mean length of stay was 29.3 days. Possible alternatives to admission were identified for 15 (19%) patients. There was no evidence of discharge planning for 50 (60%) admissions. There is considerable potential to make more appropriate utilisation of UHG for cancer patients, particularly in terms of reducing bed days and length of stay and the proportion of emergency cancer admissions, and further developing integrated systems of discharge planning.