• Endovascular repair of early rupture of Dacron aortic graft--two case reports.

      Sultan, Sherif; Heskin, Leonie; Oaikhinan, Kenneth; Hynes, Naimh; Akhter, Yousaf; Courtney, Donald; Western Vascular Institute, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway, Ireland. sherifsultan@esatclear.ie (Vascular and endovascular surgery, 2005)
      Complications after open aortic surgery pose a challenge both to the vascular surgeon and the patient because of aging population, widespread use of cardiac revascularization, and improved survival after aortic surgery. The perioperative mortality rate for redo elective aortic surgery ranges from 5% to 29% and increases to 70-100% in emergency situation. Endovascular treatment of the postaortic open surgery (PAOS) patient has fewer complications and a lower mortality rate in comparison with redo open surgical repair. Two cases of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were managed with the conventional open surgical repair. Subsequently, spiral contrast computer tomography scans showed reperfusion of the AAA sac remnant mimicking a type III endoleak. These graft-related complications presented as vascular emergencies, and in both cases endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedure was performed successfully by aortouniiliac (AUI) stent graft and femorofemoral crossover bypass. These 2 patients add further merit to the cases reported in the English literature. This highlights the crucial importance of endovascular grafts in the management of such complex vascular problems.
    • Five years' experience of transverse groin incision for femoral artery access in arterial reconstructive surgery: parallel observational longitudinal group comparison study.

      Beirne, Christopher; Martin, Fiachra; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Western Vascular Institute, University College Hospital Galway, Galway, Ireland. (Vascular, 2008-07)
      Vertical groin incisions (VGIs) have been used to access femoral vessels, but reports allude to wound complications. Our aim was to compare VGI with transverse groin incision (TGI) for femoral artery exposure. Over a 5-year interval, 196 patients with 284 femoral artery exposures for supra- and infrainguinal procedures were studied. Primary endpoints were surgical skin site wound infection, seroma, haematoma formation, and major lower limb amputation. Secondary endpoints were graft patency, wound paresthesias, and length of hospital stay. There were 160 TGIs and 124 VGIs. The demographics and risk factor profile were not statistically different between groups. Seroma developed in 4.4% of TGIs and 13.7% of VGIs (p= .005). The complicated skin and soft tissue infection rate was five times greater with VGI (p= .001). The VGI group had a significantly higher rate of major amputation (p= .0005). Significantly higher graft failure rates were observed in the VGI group (p= .011). No paresthesia was reported in any TGI wound. The mean hospital stay was also significantly shorter in the TGI group (p= .006). The study data support and expound on the theory that an alternative incision to VGI offers lower short- and long-term morbidity. Our findings sustain the selection of the TGI in femoral artery surgery for both supra- and infrainguinal procedures without compromise of vessel exposure.
    • Salvage of critical limb ischemia with the "trellis reserve'' of subintimal superficial femoral-popliteal artery occlusion: a new modality in managing critical limb ischemia--a case report.

      Sultan, Sherif; Heskin, Leonie; Hynes, Niamh; Akhtar, Yousaf; Cough, Val; Manning, Brian; Aremu, M; Courtney, D; Western Vascular Institute, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University College Hospital Galway, Ireland. sherifsultan@esatclear.ie (Vascular and endovascular surgery, 2005)
      Subintimal angioplasty is a safe, effective, but nondurable procedure in treating long superficial femoral artery occlusions in patients with severe lower limb ischemia. The authors report a case of acute thrombosis that presented 16 weeks after subintimal angioplasty. The ;;Trellis'' percutaneous thrombolytic infusion system permitted a controlled site-specific infusion of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA). The unique design of the ;;Trellis'' allowed complete aspiration of thrombus and avoiding regional and systemic thrombolytic side effects. The ;;Trellis'' system is effective in percutaneous management of thrombotic lesions; however, intimal dissection may need to be addressed.