• Apixaban-Associated Spontaneous Splenic Rupture - A Case Report

      Abdelhady, A; Ahmed, A; Mohamed, Y; Binchy, J; University Hospital Galway (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-07)
      A 62-year-old lady presented to The Emergency Department (ED) with one-day history of dizziness, vomiting and feeling weak. ECG showed new onset Atrial Fibrillation. Four days ago, she was referred to the Cardiology team where she underwent PCI and was discharged on Apixaban and Plavix. Two days later she represented to the ED pale and hypotensive with BP 70/50. CT-Abdomen showed a large splenic hematoma and thickening of the inferior wall of the stomach.
    • Attitudes and Knowledge of Healthcare Professionals Regarding Organ Donation. A Survey of the Saolta University Health Care Group.

      Umana, E; Grant, O; Curran, E; May, P; Mohamed, A; O’Donnell, J; University Hospital Galway (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-11)
      Organ donation saves lives and healthcare professionals (HCPs) play a vital role in that process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes and level of knowledge of HCPs regarding organ donation. An online anonymous self-administered questionnaire containing 40 questions on organ donation using google forms was created. The survey was distributed to HCPs working in the Saolta University Health Care Group. A hundred and thirty-nine responses were received giving a response rate of 11.8%. HCPs willingness to donate their organs was at 93% compared to 97% willing to receive a transplant. More HCPs understood or had knowledge of the term donation after brain death (64%) than donation after circulatory death (49%). HCPs working in intensive care knew more about the management of brain dead donors than other specialties (p<0.0001). Over 60% of HCPs when asked either disagreed or strongly disagreed with the adequacy of training in organ donation and transplant. Overall, HCPs surveyed had positive attitudes towards organ donation but there was a lack of knowledge particularly among non-intensive care professionals. This study highlights the need to increase awareness along with implementation of educational programmes among HCPs regarding organ donation and transplant.
    • Management of Paediatric Buckle (Torus) Wrist Fractures in Irish Emergency Departments: A National Survey

      Abdelhady, A; Ahmed, A; Umana, E; O’Donnell, J; University Hospital Galway (Irish Medical Journal, 2018-07)
      Buckle fractures are the most common wrist fractures reported in the paediatric age group. National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends using a non-rigid immobilisation with no follow up for these patients and appropriate discharge advice. A telephone survey was conducted to assess the variation in practice in Irish hospitals regarding the mpediatrianagement of buckle fractures. Twenty eight centres that manage paediatric patients with trauma were contacted. This survey demonstrates that over 70% (>20) of centres in Ireland are managing buckle fractures using the traditional approach of backslab cast and follow-up in fracture clinic. Despite relevant research and NICE guideline recommendations, there is a slow adoption of current evidence among Irish hospitals which points to a need for a national consensus on management of buckle fractures.