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dc.contributor.authorClarke, B
dc.contributor.authorKennelly, S
dc.contributor.authorShanley, D
dc.contributor.authorHogan-Lowe, D
dc.contributor.authorMcCormack, P M E
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T14:38:17Z
dc.date.available2011-03-28T14:38:17Z
dc.date.issued2010-01
dc.identifier.citationDoes HIPE data capture the complexity of stroke patients in an acute hospital setting? 2010, 103 (1):23-4 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid20222391
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/125868
dc.description.abstractThe Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE) system is currently used as a principle source of national data on discharges from acute hospitals. The Casemix Programme is used to calculate funding for patient care (HIPE activity and Specialty Costs Returns). Th coding is usually undertaken by clerical personnel. We were concerned that the medical complexity of our stroke patients was not captured by the process. The aims of this study were to compare activity coded by HIPE coding staff and medical staff in consecutive stroke patients discharged from the hospital. One hundred consecutive discharged patients with stroke as primary diagnosis were coded by clerical staff [usual practice] and by medical staff. We compared the coding and any differences. We calculated the financial comparison of subsequent differences in Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) and Relative Values (RVs). Clinician coded DRGs resulted in a higher assigned RV in 45 cases. The total RV value for HIPE using clerical coding was 595,268.94 euros and using medical coding was 725,252.16 euros. We conclude that medical input is useful in detailing the complications arising in stroke patients. We suggest that physicians should assist in the HIPE coding process in order to capture clinical complexity, so that funding can be appropriately assigned to manage these complex patients.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis-Related Groups
dc.subject.meshForms and Records Control
dc.subject.meshHealth Resources
dc.subject.meshHospitals
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay
dc.subject.meshPatient Discharge
dc.subject.meshRelative Value Scales
dc.subject.meshStroke
dc.titleDoes HIPE data capture the complexity of stroke patients in an acute hospital setting?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T11:38:16Z
html.description.abstractThe Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE) system is currently used as a principle source of national data on discharges from acute hospitals. The Casemix Programme is used to calculate funding for patient care (HIPE activity and Specialty Costs Returns). Th coding is usually undertaken by clerical personnel. We were concerned that the medical complexity of our stroke patients was not captured by the process. The aims of this study were to compare activity coded by HIPE coding staff and medical staff in consecutive stroke patients discharged from the hospital. One hundred consecutive discharged patients with stroke as primary diagnosis were coded by clerical staff [usual practice] and by medical staff. We compared the coding and any differences. We calculated the financial comparison of subsequent differences in Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) and Relative Values (RVs). Clinician coded DRGs resulted in a higher assigned RV in 45 cases. The total RV value for HIPE using clerical coding was 595,268.94 euros and using medical coding was 725,252.16 euros. We conclude that medical input is useful in detailing the complications arising in stroke patients. We suggest that physicians should assist in the HIPE coding process in order to capture clinical complexity, so that funding can be appropriately assigned to manage these complex patients.


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