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dc.contributor.authorAllen, P Finbarr
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Maeve
dc.contributor.authorLocker, David
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-09T14:25:57Z
dc.date.available2011-03-09T14:25:57Z
dc.date.issued2009-04
dc.identifier.citationDetermining the minimally important difference for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20. 2009, 117 (2):129-34 Eur. J. Oral Sci.en
dc.identifier.issn1600-0722
dc.identifier.pmid19320721
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0722.2009.00610.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/124045
dc.description.abstractIn the context of clinical trials, measurement of change is critical. The aim of this study was to determine the minimally important difference (MID) for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) when used with partially dentate patients undergoing treatment that included the provision of removable partial dentures. In a prospective clinical trial, 51 consecutive patients were provided with removable partial dentures. In addition to demographic and dental status data, patients completed an OHIP-20 prior to treatment. One month postoperatively, patients completed a post-treatment OHIP-20 and a global transition scale. Domains assessed in the global transition scale were appearance, ability to chew food, oral comfort, and speech. The MID for the OHIP-20 was calculated using the anchor-based approach. From the initial sample of 51 patients, 44 completed post-treatment questionnaires and were included in the analysis. Change scores in the four transition domains indicated that new dentures had a positive impact in the majority of subjects, especially in perceived impact on chewing and appearance. The study provided a guideline as to what constitutes the MID for the OHIP-20. This benchmark can be used when interpreting the impact of clinical intervention for replacing missing teeth and for power calculation in statistical analyses.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshCost of Illness
dc.subject.meshDenture, Partial, Removable
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshJaw, Edentulous, Partially
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificity
dc.subject.meshSickness Impact Profile
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleDetermining the minimally important difference for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Restorative Dentistry, Cork University Dental School & Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. f.allen@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of oral sciencesen
dc.description.provinceMunster
html.description.abstractIn the context of clinical trials, measurement of change is critical. The aim of this study was to determine the minimally important difference (MID) for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) when used with partially dentate patients undergoing treatment that included the provision of removable partial dentures. In a prospective clinical trial, 51 consecutive patients were provided with removable partial dentures. In addition to demographic and dental status data, patients completed an OHIP-20 prior to treatment. One month postoperatively, patients completed a post-treatment OHIP-20 and a global transition scale. Domains assessed in the global transition scale were appearance, ability to chew food, oral comfort, and speech. The MID for the OHIP-20 was calculated using the anchor-based approach. From the initial sample of 51 patients, 44 completed post-treatment questionnaires and were included in the analysis. Change scores in the four transition domains indicated that new dentures had a positive impact in the majority of subjects, especially in perceived impact on chewing and appearance. The study provided a guideline as to what constitutes the MID for the OHIP-20. This benchmark can be used when interpreting the impact of clinical intervention for replacing missing teeth and for power calculation in statistical analyses.


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