• Decontamination in Hospitals and Healthcare

      Coleman, D.C.; O’Donnell, M.J.; Miller, A.S.; Boyle, M.A.; Dublin Dental University Hospital (2015-07-03)
    • The deformation and strength of a dental ceramic following resin-cement coating.

      Isgró, G; Addison, O; Fleming, G J P; Materials Science Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland. g_isgro@tiscali.it (2011-02)
      The hypothesis tested was that processing, pre-cementation and cementation techniques can modify the profilometrically measured deformation of a ceramic.
    • Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

      Isgró, G; Addison, O; Fleming, G J P; Materials Science Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland. giuseppe.isgro@dental.tcd.ie (2010-01)
      Stress-induced changes imparted in a 'dentin-bonded-crown' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the 'flatness'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the 'fit' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic 'hybrid layer' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.
    • Demographics of implant placement and complications of a patient subgroup in a dental hospital population.

      Brennan, Maire; Houston, Frank; O'Sullivan, Michael; O'Connell, Brian; Department of Restorative Dentistry, University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork. (2011-03-14)
      Little has been reported about the demographics of implant placement in the Irish population and the complications that occur. This is important in terms of service planning and providing patient information.
    • Dental caries and its association with sociodemographics, erosion, and diet in schoolchildren from southeast Brazil.

      Auad, Sheyla Marcia; Waterhouse, Paula Jane; Nunn, June Heather; Moynihan, Paula Jane; Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. smauadtc@gmail.com (2009-05)
      The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of caries in a sample of Brazilian schoolchildren, test associotions between caries, sociodemographics, and erosion, and investigate potential dietary factors common to both conditions.
    • Dental caries experience of schoolchildren of two different oral health care delivery systems.

      Sagheri, Darius; Wassmer, Gernot; Hahn, Petra; McLoughlin, Jacinta; Department of Public and Child Dental Health, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, Trinity College, Republic of Ireland. darius.sagheri@dental.tcd.ie (2009-06)
      To report on the dental caries experience in schoolchildren from a region with a needs-based dental service compared with a region with a demand-led dental service.
    • Dental health and management for children with congenital heart disease.

      FitzGerald, Kirsten; Fleming, Pádraig; Franklin, Orla; Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin 12, Republic of Ireland. kirsten.fitzgerald@olchc.ie (2010-01)
      Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common developmental anomalies. Children with CHD are at increased risk of developing oral disease, and are at increased risk from the systemic effects of oral disease. Recent changes in guidelines related to prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have highlighted the importance of establishing and maintaining oral health for this group of patients. The management of children with CHD can be complex and, unfortunately, many of these children do not receive the care they require. The challenges that these children pose are discussed, and suggestions are made for the appropriate management of these patients and the key role that all those working in primary dental care have to play.
    • Dental implant restoration

      Jacobs, SH; O’Connell, B (Quintessence Publishing, London, 2011)
    • Dental implants and single implant-supported restorations

      Warreth, Abdulhadi; McAleese, Emma; McDonnell, Peter; Slami, Roumaissa; Guray, Marie Suna (Irish Dental Association, 2013-02)
    • Dental interventions in patients taking anti-resorptive medication for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone disease: an audit of current practice in the Dublin Dental University Hospital

      Henry, Cían J.; O’Reilly, Rory; Stassen, Leo F.A. (Irish Dental Association, 2017-10)
      Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) is a well-established complication of anti-resorptive and, more recently, anti-angiogenic therapy. The dental profession has a pivotal role to play in the prevention and management of this debilitating condition, and all dentists have a responsibility to remain cognisant of national and international best practice guidelines in the prevention of this disease process.
    • Dental interventions in patients taking anti-resorptive medication for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone disease: an audit of current practice in the Dublin Dental University Hospital

      Henry, Cian; Stassen, Leo F.A.; O’Reilly, Rory (Irish Dental Association, 2017-11)
      Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) is a well-established complication of anti-resorptive and, more recently, anti-angiogenic therapy. The dental profession has a pivotal role to play in the prevention and management of this debilitating condition, and all dentists have a responsibility to remain cognisant of national and international best practice guidelines in the prevention of this disease process. The management of patients in the Dublin Dental University Hospital at risk of MRONJ when carrying out dental interventions was audited against nationally- and internationally-published guidelines. The results of the audit showed compliance with the national and international guidance in 5% and 0% of cases, respectively. The most common measures implemented in the management of patients at risk of MRONJ were: preoperative antibiotics in 49% of cases; preoperative chlorhexidine mouthwash in 76%; plain local anaesthetic in 51%; and, post-operative antibiotics in 80%.
    • Dental nursing across Ireland

      Sheridan, C (Journal of the Irish Dental Association, 2009-08)
    • The Dentist’s role within the multi-disciplinary team maintaining quality of life for oral cancer patients inlight of recent advances in radiotherapy

      Brody, Sarah; Omer, Osama; McLoughlin, Jacinta; Stassen, Leo (Irish Dental Association, 2013-06)
      Every year in Ireland over 400 people are diagnosed with head and neck cancer. Oral cancer, a specific type of head and neck cancer, is usually treated with surgery and often requires radiotherapy (RT). However, side effects of RT treatment, which include mucositis, xerostomia, radiation caries, trismus and osteoradionecrosis, can seriously compromise a patient’s quality of life. Treatment for oral cancer patients is managed in a multidisciplinary team. General dental practitioners (GDPs), consultant/specialist dentists and oral-maxillofacial surgeons play an important role in these patients’ care. Recent advances in the delivery of RT have not only improved locoregional control and survival rates, but have also reduced the incidence and severity of RT-associated side effects; however, no mode of RT delivery has successfully eliminated side effects. The role of dentists is essential in maintaining oral health and all patients should be dentally screened prior to commencing RT. Recent reports have attempted to standardise the quality of care for the oral cancer patient and have highlighted the significance of the role of the GDP. Despite the advancements in RT delivery, the dental team is still faced with a number of challenges, including the high number of patients lost to follow-up dental care, lack of an effective treatment for xerostomia, poor patient compliance, and a lack of standardised guidelines and funding. Addressing these challenges will involve increased communication between all members of the multidisciplinary team and increased involvement of the GDP, thereby ensuring that dental care continues to evolve concurrently with new methods of RT delivery.
    • Detection of mecC-Positive Staphylococcus aureus (CC130-MRSA-XI) in Diseased European Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in Sweden

      Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widen, Dolores; Mattsson, Roland; Rangstrup-Christensen, Lena; Lazaris, Alexandros; Coleman, David C.; Shore, Anna C.; Ehricht, Ralf; Dublin Dental University Hospital (2013-06-12)
    • Detection of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type XI carrying highly divergent mecA, mecI, mecR1, blaZ, and ccr genes in human clinical isolates of clonal complex 130 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

      Shore, Anna C; Deasy, Emily C; Slickers, Peter; Brennan, Grainne; O'Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Coleman, David C; Microbiology Research Unit, Dublin Dental University Hospital, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. (2011-08)
      Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is mediated by penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a), encoded by mecA on mobile staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. In this study, two clonal complex 130 (CC130) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients in Irish hospitals were identified that were phenotypically PBP 2a positive but lacked mecA by conventional PCR and by DNA microarray screening. The isolates were identified as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus using the GeneXpert real-time PCR assay. Whole-genome sequencing of one isolate (M10/0061) revealed a 30-kb SCCmec element encoding a class E mec complex with highly divergent blaZ-mecA-mecR1-mecI, a type 8 cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex consisting of ccrA1-ccrB3, an arsenic resistance operon, and flanking direct repeats (DRs). The SCCmec element was almost identical to that of SCCmec type XI (SCCmec XI) identified by the Sanger Institute in sequence type 425 bovine MRSA strain LGA251 listed on the website of the International Working Group on the Classification of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome Elements. The open reading frames (ORFs) identified within SCCmec XI of M10/0061 exhibited 21 to 93% amino acid identity to ORFs in GenBank. A third DR was identified ca. 3 kb downstream of SCCmec XI, indicating the presence of a possible SCC remnant. SCCmec XI was also identified in the second CC130 MRSA isolate by PCR and sequencing. The CC130 MRSA isolates may be of animal origin as previously reported CC130 S. aureus strains were predominantly from bovine sources. The highly divergent nature of SCCmec XI relative to other SCCmec elements indicates that it may have originated in another taxon.
    • Developing an undergraduate curriculum in Special Care Dentistry - by consensus.

      Dougall, A; Pani, S C; Thompson, S; Faulks, D; Romer, M; Nunn, J; Dublin University Dental Hospital, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. alison.dougall@dental.tcd.ie (European journal of dental education : official journal of the Association for Dental Education in Europe, 2013-02)
      It has been reported that healthcare providers often lack the skills set to provide care for people with disabilities, leading to inequalities in health and reduced access to health care. Newly graduating dentists are likely to see a significant number of patients with special healthcare needs in the course of their practicing lives. However, there is evidence of national and international variation in the availability of education and training at the undergraduate level in this important, emerging area. The quality and content of undergraduate education in Special Care Dentistry has been shown to correlate with students' confidence and their expressed willingness, towards providing care for patients with special healthcare needs in their future practice. The aim of this study was to use information from a three-round Delphi process, continued into a face-to-face meeting, to establish consensus on what constitutes the essential core knowledge, skills and attitudes required by a newly qualified dentist so that they are able to deliver patient care to diverse populations following graduation. A high level of agreement was established amongst an international panel of experts from 30 countries. The final core items identified by the panel showed a paradigm shift away from the traditional emphasis on medical diagnosis within a curriculum towards an approach based on the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) with patient-centred treatment planning for people with disabilities and special healthcare needs according to function or environment. Many of the core skills identified by the panel are transferable across a curriculum and should encourage a person-centred approach to treatment planning based on the function, needs and wishes of the patient rather than their specific diagnosis.
    • Development of a discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys.

      McGinley, Emma Louise; Fleming, Garry J P; Moran, Gary P; Materials Science Unit, Division of Oral Bioscience, Dublin Dental University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Lincoln Place, Ireland. emmalouise.mcginley@dental.tcd.ie (2011-12)
      To develop an enhanced, reproducible and discriminatory biocompatibility testing model for non-precious dental casting alloys, prepared to a clinically relevant surface finishing condition, using TR146 oral keratinocyte cells.