• Management of primary molar infraocclusion in general practice.

      McGeown, Mary; O'Connell, Anne (Irish Dental Assocation (IDA), 2014-08)
      Statement of the problem: Infraoccluded primary molars can be managed in general dental practice but clinicians need to understand when intervention is necessary.
    • Medical, nutritional, and dental considerations in children with low birth weight.

      O'Connell, Susan; O'Connell, Anne; O'Mullane, Elaine; Hoey, Hilary; Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, The National Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. soconnell5@hotmail.com (2009-11)
      It is estimated that 8 to 26 percent of infants are born with low birth weight (LBW) worldwide. These children are at risk for medical problems in childhood and adulthood and often have poor oral health. The influence of fetal growth on birth weight and its relevance to childhood growth and future adult health is controversial. Evidence now indicates that the postnatal period is a critical time when nutrition may predispose the child to lifelong metabolic disturbance and obesity. Given the lack of consensus on optimum infant nutrition for LBW, premature, and small-for-gestational-age infants, many such infants may be suboptimally managed. This may result in rapid postnatal weight gain and ongoing health problems. The purpose of this review was to summarize medical terminology and issues related to fetal growth, morbidity associated with being born low birth weight, premature, or small for gestational age, and the importance of appropriate nutrition in such infants. Pediatric dentists can play an important role in supporting healthy feeding practices and improving long-term health in these children. Early integrated medical and dental care should be encouraged for all children with low birth weight.
    • Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.

      Hashem, Atef A; O'Connell, Brian; Nunn, June; O'Connell, Anne; Garvey, Therese; O'Sullivan, Michael; Division of Restorative Dentistry & Periodontology, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2. (2010)
      PURPOSE: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Details of 168 patients with hypodontia referred during the period 2002-2006 were entered in a database designed as a national record. Tooth charting was completed using clinical and radiographic examinations. The age of patients ranged from 7-50 years, with a median age of 20 years (Mean: 21.79; SD: 8.005). RESULTS: Hypodontia referrals constituted 65.5% of the total referrals. Females were more commonly affected than males with a ratio of 1.3:1. The number of referrals reflected the population density in this area; the majority were referrals from the public dental service. Mandibular second premolars were the most commonly missing teeth, followed by maxillary second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors; maxillary central incisors were the least affected. Symmetry of tooth agenesis between the right and left sides was an evident feature. Slightly more teeth were missing on the left side (n = 725) than on the right side (n = 706) and in the maxillary arch (n = 768) as compared to the mandibular arch (n = 663). Some 54% of patients had severe hypodontia with more than six teeth missing; 32% had moderate hypodontia, with four to six teeth missing. The most common pattern of tooth agenesis was four missing teeth. CONCLUSION: Hypodontia was a common presentation in a population referred to this tertiary care clinic. The pattern and distribution of tooth agenesis in Irish patients appears to follow the patterns reported in the literature.
    • Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.

      Hashem, Atef A; O'Connell, Brian; Nunn, June; O'Connell, Anne; Garvey, Therese; O'Sullivan, Michael; Division of Restorative Dentistry & Periodontology, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2. (Irish Dental Association, 2010-02)
      This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders.