Research undertaken by staff affiliated to Dublin Dental University Hospital

Recent Submissions

  • An audit of the baseline dental status and treatment need of individuals referred to Dublin Dental University Hospital for a pre-radiotherapy dental and oral assessment

    MacCarthy, Denise (Irish Dental Association, 2017-11)
    he objectives of this audit were to establish the baseline dental status and treatment need of pre-radiation head and neck cancer patients in Ireland.
  • Dental interventions in patients taking anti-resorptive medication for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone disease: an audit of current practice in the Dublin Dental University Hospital

    Henry, Cian; Stassen, Leo F.A.; O’Reilly, Rory (Irish Dental Association, 2017-11)
    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) is a well-established complication of anti-resorptive and, more recently, anti-angiogenic therapy. The dental profession has a pivotal role to play in the prevention and management of this debilitating condition, and all dentists have a responsibility to remain cognisant of national and international best practice guidelines in the prevention of this disease process. The management of patients in the Dublin Dental University Hospital at risk of MRONJ when carrying out dental interventions was audited against nationally- and internationally-published guidelines. The results of the audit showed compliance with the national and international guidance in 5% and 0% of cases, respectively. The most common measures implemented in the management of patients at risk of MRONJ were: preoperative antibiotics in 49% of cases; preoperative chlorhexidine mouthwash in 76%; plain local anaesthetic in 51%; and, post-operative antibiotics in 80%.
  • Tips for splinting traumatised teeth

    Leith, Rona; O’Connell, Anne C. (Irish Dental Association, 2017-11)
    A splint is required when teeth are mobile or need to be repositioned following a traumatic injury. The aim of splinting is to stabilise the injured tooth and maintain its position throughout the splinting period, improve function and provide comfort. Current best practice guidelines from the International Association for Dental Traumatology (IADT) recommend splinting for luxated, avulsed, root fractured and traumatically loosened permanent teeth.1,2 Splinting of primary teeth is usually not feasible. In general, the prognosis of a traumatised tooth is determined by the type of injury rather than the type of splint.3 However, correct splinting is important to maximise healing of the soft and hard tissues, and prevent further injury.1
  • An audit of the baseline dental status and treatment need of individuals referred to Dublin Dental University Hospital for a pre-radiotherapy dental and oral assessment

    MacCarthy, Denise; Clarke, Mary; O’Regan, Myra (Irish Dental Association, 2017-10)
    The objectives of this audit were to establish the baseline dental status and treatment need of pre-radiation head and neck cancer patients in Ireland
  • Dental interventions in patients taking anti-resorptive medication for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone disease: an audit of current practice in the Dublin Dental University Hospital

    Henry, Cían J.; O’Reilly, Rory; Stassen, Leo F.A. (Irish Dental Association, 2017-10)
    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) is a well-established complication of anti-resorptive and, more recently, anti-angiogenic therapy. The dental profession has a pivotal role to play in the prevention and management of this debilitating condition, and all dentists have a responsibility to remain cognisant of national and international best practice guidelines in the prevention of this disease process.
  • Tips for splinting traumatised teeth

    Leith, Rona; O’Connell, Anne C. (Irish Dental Association, 2017-10)
    A splint is required when teeth are mobile or need to be repositioned following a traumatic injury. The aim of splinting is to stabilise the injured tooth and maintain its position throughout the splinting period, improve function and provide comfort. Current best practice guidelines from the International Association for Dental Traumatology (IADT) recommend splinting for luxated, avulsed, root fractured and traumatically loosened permanent teeth.1,2 Splinting of primary teeth is usually not feasible. In general, the prognosis of a traumatised tooth is determined by the type of injury rather than the type of splint.3 However, correct splinting is important to maximise healing of the soft and hard tissues, and prevent further injury.1-6
  • Plaque control and oral hygiene methods

    Harrison, Peter; Dublin Dental Hospital (Irish Dental Association, 2017-06)
    The experimental gingivitis study of Löe et al.1 demonstrated a cause and effect relationship between plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation, and helped to establish plaque/biofilm as the primary risk factor for gingivitis. When healthy individuals withdrew oral hygiene efforts, gingival inflammation ensued within 21 days in all subjects. Once effective plaque removal was recommenced, clinical gingival health was quickly re-established – indicating that plaque-associated inflammation is modifiable by plaque control. As current consensus confirms that gingivitis and periodontitis may be viewed as a continuum of disease,2 the rationale for achieving effective plaque control is clear.
  • First tooth, first visit, zero cavities: a review of the evidence as it applies to Ireland

    Duane, Brett; McGovern, Eleanor; Ní Chaollaí, Aifric; FitzGerald, Kirsten (Journal of Irish Dental Association, 2017-04)
    In recent years several studies have demonstrated that dental caries is already well established by the time a child reaches three years of age. In Scotland, for example, three-year-old children had a caries prevalence of 25%, with a higher rate of 32% in children living in deprived areas, when examined in 2007/2008.1 In England in 2013, 12% of three-year-old children had experienced dental decay and those children with dental disease had approximately three teeth that were decayed, missing or filled.
  • Ready to crown

    McReynolds, David (Journal of the Irish Dental Association, 2017-04)
    When multiple teeth or localised segments of the mouth require crowns, the restorative interventions involved can be psychologically and physically demanding for the operator, patient and dental technician alike.1,2 It is important that all parties involved in restorations of this nature hold a shared understanding of the expected outcome of treatment, with a realistic, common end goal in mind right from the very beginning. Such clarity of thought and communication is key to avoiding biological, mechanical and aesthetic failures in the planning and execution of advanced restorative treatments. Biomechanically stable and aesthetically pleasing provisional restorations are an essential aspect of treatment, which allow teeth to be prepared and provisionalised over multiple appointments within the comfort zone of the operator and patient.3
  • The non-healing extraction socket: a diagnostic dilemma – case report and discussion

    Henry, Cian (Irish Dental Assocation (IDA), 2016-08)
    Although the healing of extraction sockets is generally a rapid and uncomplicated process, delayed healing, overt infection, or failure of recent exodontia sites to heal can occur. Delayed healing is reported to occur in less than 11% of all extractions.1 A variety of factors may be implicated and the dental clinician must be aware pre-operatively of both local and systemic influences. The vast majority of cases are the result of innocuous, local factors such as dry socket or infection.1 However, the potentially life-threatening, malignant lesions complicating this phenomenon can be underestimated.2-8 Therefore, it is incumbent on dental professionals to familiarise themselves with the normal inflammatory and reparative processes involved in the restitution of mucosal continuity which follow extraction, and the potential pathological lesions that interfere with healing. Failure of an extraction socket to exhibit satisfactory signs of healing in a timely manner (within three to four weeks) warrants urgent referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for investigation.
  • Clinical and radiographic assessment of maxillary canine eruption status in a group of 11- to 14-year-old Irish children

    Daly, Kieran T. (Irish Dental Assocation (IDA), 2016-06)
    In this study of 480 11- to 14-year-old Irish schoolchildren, 1.1% of the maxillary canines reviewed showed a potentially ectopic eruption position.
  • Results of a survey of current work practices and future aspirations of members of the Irish Dental Hygienists Association, relative to their scope of practice

    Waldron, Catherine; Pigott-Glynn, Bairbre (Irish Dental Assocation (IDA), 2016-02)
    Dental hygienists (DHs) in Ireland have a choice regarding undertaking further training to update their skills to the current scope of practice. No data exists in relation to how many DHs have updated their skills, how often they use these new skills and how confident they are in using them
  • Prospective audit of postoperative instructions to patients undergoing root canal treatment in the DDUH and re-audit following introduction of a written patient information sheet

    Moorthy, A; Alkadhimi, AF; Stassen, Leo F; Duncan, HF (Irish Dental Assocation (IDA), 2016-02)
    An audit of the delivery and documentation of postoperative instructions to patients undergoing root canal treatment in the DDUH demonstrated unfavourable results compared to the ideal benchmark. Introduction of a postoperative leaflet significantly improved the content and consistency of the advice and will be implemented in future
  • Fundamentals of occlusion and restorative dentistry. Part II: occlusal contacts, interferences and occlusal considerations in implant patients

    Warreth, Abdulhadi (Irish Dental Assocation (IDA), 2015-10)
    This second part of the two-part article discusses different types of occlusal contacts and their interferences. It also provides a practical guide to what is required to optimise the restorative treatment outcome. Occlusion and its effect on dental implants are also presented. Clinical relevance: Restorative treatment outcome is highly dependent on the occlusion of the restoration when the treatment is complete
  • Fundamentals of occlusion and restorative dentistry. Part I: basic principles

    Warreth, Abdulhadi (Irish Dental Association (IDA), 2015-08)
    One of the goals of restorative treatment is maintenance and/or reestablishment of a good dental occlusion when the treatment is completed.1,2 Therefore, restorative treatment should be aimed at the achievement of smooth unhindered mandibular movements during function. The outcome should not result in an occlusal interference, nor should it lead to generation of excessive force on the teeth, the periodontal apparatus or the temporomandibular joints (TMJs).3,4 All members of the masticatory system should work in harmony and accommodate the changes in occlusal morphology of the finished restoration well.4 Therefore, dentists must have a sound knowledge of dental occlusion and masticatory systems. This article provides clarification of the basic principles of dental occlusion, as well as an overview of this subject area, which is vital for every dental student and dentist. To avoid confusion, the terms and definitions of the Glossary of Prosthodontics5 are used.
  • Does the dentist have a role in identifying patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus?

    Sultan, A; Warreth, A; Fleming, P; MacCarthy, D (Journal of the Irish Dental Association, 2014-12)
    Diabetes mellitus is a syndrome of abnormal carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism that is caused by an absolute or relative lack of insulin.1 Type 1 diabetes usually develops in childhood and has a genetic, viral or autoimmune aetiology. Type 2 diabetes has a multifactorial aetiology with a strong genetic component and the condition can be prevented by simple lifestyle education
  • Mandibular implant-supported overdentures: attachment systems, and number and locations of implants – Part I

    Abdulhadi Warreth; Aslam Fadel Alkadhimi; Ahmed Sultan; Trinity College Dublin (Journal of the Irish Dental Association, 2015-04)
    The use of dental implants in replacing missing teeth is an integral part of restorative dental treatment. Use of conventional complete dentures is associated with several problems such as lack of denture stability, support and retention. However, when mandibular complete dentures were used with two or more implants, an improvement in the patients’ psychological and social well-being could be seen. There is general consensus that removable implant-supported overdentures (RISOs) with two implants should be considered as the first-choice standard of care for an edentulous mandible. This treatment option necessitates the use of attachment systems that connect the complete denture to the implant. Nevertheless, each attachment system has its inherent advantages and disadvantages, which should be considered when choosing a system. The first part of this article provides an overview on options available to restore the mandibular edentulous arch with dental implants. Different types of attachment systems, their features and drawbacks are also reviewed.
  • The occurrence of paraesthesia of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve after dental local anaesthetic use: a case report

    Moorthy, Advan; Stassen, Leo FA (Journal of the Irish Dental Association, 2015-02)
    Local anaesthetics are usually safe, effective and indispensable drugs used routinely in dentistry. Local anaesthetics allow dentistry to be practised in a painfree environment. However, their use may involve complications. Paraesthesia can be defined as persistent anaesthesia (anaesthesia well beyond the expected duration) or as an altered sensation (tingling or itching).1-3 It is the result of damage to a nerve and the occurrence of paraesthesia following the use of local anaesthesia in dentistry represents a rare but important side effect, which is often under-reported4-8 and is important in medico-legal practice. To date, there have been very few recorded incidences or published cases of maxillary nerve paraesthesia following the use of dental local anaesthetic for a routine extraction
  • Mandibular implant-supported overdentures: attachment systems, and number and locations of implants – Part II

    Warreth, Abdulhadi; Byrne, Caroline; Fadel Alkadhimi, Aslam; Woods, Edel; Sultan, Ahmed (Journal of the Irish Dental Association, 2015-06)
    Factors to be considered when selecting an attachment type Selection of an attachment system that is suitable for a specific clinical situation is sometimes difficult. A good knowledge of the different systems and their mechanical properties, and the way in which they distribute load, is important. For instance, when short implants are used resilient attachments should be applied to ensure a degree of relief on the supporting implants. This allows denture movements to occur and enables the edentulous ridge to absorb the masticatory forces. Consequently, a significant amount of masticatory force is dissipated by the edentulous ridge. Some factors that should be identified and considered in order to obtain the best treatment option with the use of RISOs include the following:

View more