• The demographic and academic profile of Irish dental school faculty members.

      O'Sullivan, Eleanor M; Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork. eleanor.osullivan@ucc.ie (Irish Dental Association, 2009-12)
      This paper reviews the demographic, academic and professional profile of Irish dental school faculty members. Faculty duties are explored.
    • Demographics of implant placement and complications of a patient subgroup in a dental hospital population.

      Brennan, Maire; Houston, Frank; O'Sullivan, Michael; O'Connell, Brian; Department of Restorative Dentistry, University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork. (Irish Dental Association, 2010-05)
      Little has been reported about the demographics of implant placement in the Irish population and the complications that occur. This is important in terms of service planning and providing patient information.
    • Dental patients' use of the Internet.

      Ní Ríordáin, R; McCreary, C; Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. richeal.nirordain@ucc.ie (2009-12-19)
      To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and 'dental tourism'.
    • Dentists’ requirements for continuing professional development in Ireland. A pilot study conducted at University College Cork

      Stewart, Christopher; Kinirons, Martin (Journal of the Irish Dental Association, 2015-02)
      This research was a pilot study of the ways in which the continuing professional development (CPD) needs of dentists could be provided. A web-based questionnaire facility was used to enable dental practitioners to register their level of interest in a range of clinical topics presented as CPD lectures and practical courses to provide hands-on experience. The findings were reviewed with reference to the available literature on dental CPD. The study sought to inform development of dental CPD programmes.
    • Determining the minimally important difference for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20.

      Allen, P Finbarr; O'Sullivan, Maeve; Locker, David; Department of Restorative Dentistry, Cork University Dental School & Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. f.allen@ucc.ie (2009-04)
      In the context of clinical trials, measurement of change is critical. The aim of this study was to determine the minimally important difference (MID) for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) when used with partially dentate patients undergoing treatment that included the provision of removable partial dentures. In a prospective clinical trial, 51 consecutive patients were provided with removable partial dentures. In addition to demographic and dental status data, patients completed an OHIP-20 prior to treatment. One month postoperatively, patients completed a post-treatment OHIP-20 and a global transition scale. Domains assessed in the global transition scale were appearance, ability to chew food, oral comfort, and speech. The MID for the OHIP-20 was calculated using the anchor-based approach. From the initial sample of 51 patients, 44 completed post-treatment questionnaires and were included in the analysis. Change scores in the four transition domains indicated that new dentures had a positive impact in the majority of subjects, especially in perceived impact on chewing and appearance. The study provided a guideline as to what constitutes the MID for the OHIP-20. This benchmark can be used when interpreting the impact of clinical intervention for replacing missing teeth and for power calculation in statistical analyses.
    • Effect of pre-heating on the viscosity and microhardness of a resin composite.

      Lucey, S; Lynch, C D; Ray, N J; Burke, F M; Hannigan, A; Restorative Dentistry, University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. (2010-04)
      The effect of pre-heating resin composite on pre-cured viscosity and post-cured surface hardness was evaluated. Groups of uncured specimens were heated to 60 degrees C and compared with control groups (24 degrees C) with respect to viscosity and surface hardness. Mean (SD) viscosities of the pre-heated specimens (n = 15) were in the range of 285 (13)-377 (11) (Pa) compared with 642 (35)-800 (23) (Pa) at ambient temperature. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.001). Mean (SD) Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the pre-heated group (n = 15) was 68.6 (2.3) for the top surface and 68.7 (1.8) for the bottom surface measured at 24 h post curing (specimen thickness = 1.5 mm). The corresponding values for the room temperature group were 60.6 (1.4) and 59.0 (3.5). There was a statistically significant difference between corresponding measurements taken at the top and bottom for the pre-heated and room temperature groups (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between top and bottom measurements within each group. Pre-heating resin composite reduces its pre-cured viscosity and enhances its subsequent surface hardness. These effects may translate as easier placement together with an increased degree of polymerization and depth-of-cure.
    • The effectiveness of 2-implant overdentures - a pragmatic international multicentre study.

      Rashid, F; Awad, M A; Thomason, J M; Piovano, A; Spielberg, G P; Scilingo, E; Mojon, P; Müller, F; Spielberg, M; Heydecke, G; et al. (2011-03)
      The purpose of this multicentre observational study was to determine patient satisfaction with either conventional dentures or mandibular 2-implant overdentures in a 'real world' setting. Two hundred and three edentulous patients (mean age 68·8 ± 10·4 years) were recruited at eight centres located in North America, South America and Europe. The patients were provided with new mandibular conventional dentures or implant overdentures supported by two implants and ball attachments. At baseline and at 6 months post-treatment, they rated their satisfaction with their mandibular prostheses on 100-mm visual analogue scale questionnaires. One hundred and two (50·2%) participants had valid baseline and 6-month satisfaction data. Although both groups reported improvements, the implant overdenture group reported significantly higher ratings of overall satisfaction, comfort, stability, ability to speak and ability to chew. These results suggest that edentulous patients who choose mandibular implant overdentures have significantly greater improvements in satisfaction, despite their relatively higher cost, than those who choose new conventional dentures.
    • Endodontic treatment completion following emergency pulpectomy.

      Lynch, C D; Burke, F M; Ríordáin, R Ní; Hannigan, A; Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XY, UK. LynchCD@cardiff.ac.uk (2010-06)
      Emergency pulpectomy is frequently performed to relieve pain experienced by patients following acute episodes of endodontic pain, or to limit the risks of infection or possible root resorption following traumatic pulpal exposures. The aim of this study was to examine subsequent patient attendance for completion of root canal treatment following pulpectomy procedures in a dental emergency unit.
    • Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

      Allen, Finbarr; Cork Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork. f.allen@ucc.ie (2011-03-15)
      Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.
    • Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

      Allen, Finbarr; Cork Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork. f.allen@ucc.ie (Irish Dental Association, 2010-10)
      Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.
    • Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

      Burke, F M; Whelton, H; Harding, M; Crowley, E; O'Mullane, D; Cronin, M; Kelleher, V; Byrtek, M; Oral Health Services Research Centre, University Dental School and Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. f.burke@ucc.ie (2010-10)
      The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.
    • Fluorosis prevalence among German schoolchildren may not be associated with early kindergarten-based preventive programmes.

      Whelton, Helen P; Oral Health Services Research Centre, University Dental School & Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. H.Whelton@ucc.ie (2009-03)
    • Gerodontology – how big is the challenge in Ireland

      Allen, Dr Finbar; McKenna, Dr Gerald; Mata, Dr Cristiane (Irish Dental Association, 2010-06)
    • Gerodontology--how big is the challenge in Ireland?

      Allen, Finbarr; McKenna, Gerald; Mata, Cristiane; Cronin, Michael; Woods, Noel; O'Mahony, Denis; Allen, Edith; Cork Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork. f.allen@ucc.ie (2011-03-14)
      Population trends suggest that the Irish population is ageing, and that this population will have substantial treatment needs. These patients will be better informed than previous generations, and will demand treatment aimed at preserving a natural dentition. This will impact upon delivery of oral healthcare and manpower planning needs to consider how to address the increased demand for dental care. Poor oral health is associated with systemic health problems, including cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and diabetes mellitus. It also has a negative impact upon quality of life, and the World Health Organisation has encouraged public healthcare administrators and decision makers to design effective and affordable strategies for better oral health and quality of life of older adults, which, in turn, are integrated into general health management programmes. Treatment concepts such as minimally invasive dentistry and the shortened dental arch concept are discussed in the context of these demographic changes and recommendations.
    • Head and neck cancer information on the internet: type, accuracy and content.

      Ni Riordain, Richeal; McCreary, Christine; Oral Medicine Unit, Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. richeal.niriordain@ucc.ie (2009-08)
      This study aimed to determine the type, accuracy and content of information available on the internet regarding head and neck cancer. The search engine Google was used to generate a list of the top 100 websites about head and neck cancer. The websites were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument and the JAMA benchmarks and whether the site displayed the Health on the Net seal was also recorded. The search yielded 1,650,000 sites on the Google website. Of the top 100 sites, a total of 33 sites were suitable for analysis due to duplicate links, non-functioning links and irrelevant website. 45% achieved all four JAMA benchmarks and 18% achieved only 1 benchmark. No website receiving the maximum mark on the overall score and four websites received the lowest overall score regarding the DISCERN instrument. The question with the poorest response score was 'Does it describe how the treatment choices affect overall quality of life?' 39% of the websites displayed the Health on the Net (HON) seal. A wide variety of types of information are available on the internet regarding head and neck cancer with variable accuracy levels based on both Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmarks and DISCERN. The onus lies with the practitioner to guide the patient regarding scientific reliability of information and to direct the patient in filtering the information sourced. The inclusion of quality of life related information is currently lacking and should be addressed to ensure a more comprehensive understanding for patients of treatment options.
    • The heights and weights of Irish children from the post-war era to the Celtic tiger.

      Perry, I J; Whelton, H; Harrington, J; Cousins, B; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, College Road, Cork, Republic of Ireland. i.perry@ucc.ie (2009-03)
      Childhood obesity is a significant global health issue. National level data on long-term secular trends are relatively sparse.
    • Impact of chronic oral mucosal disease on daily life: preliminary observations from a qualitative study.

      Riordain, R Ni; Meaney, S; McCreary, C; Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. richeal.niriordain@ucc.ie (2011-04)
      To explore the experience of daily life of persons with chronic oral mucosal conditions.
    • Impact of oral rehabilitation on the quality of life of partially dentate elders in a randomised controlled clinical trial: 2 year follow-up.

      McKenna, Gerald; Allen, Patrick Finbarr; Hayes, Martina; DaMata, Cristiane; Moore, Ciaran; Cronin, Michael (Plos One, 2018-01-01)
      This randomised clinical trial aimed to compare the impact of two different tooth replacement strategies for partially dentate older patients namely; removable partial dentures (RPDs) and functionally orientated treatment based on the shortened dental arch (SDA) concept, on Oral Health-related Quality of Life (OHrQOL). 89 patients completed a randomised clinical trial. Patients were recruited in two centres: Cork University Dental Hospital (CUDH) and a Geriatric Day Hospital (SFDH). 44 patients were randomly allocated to the RPD group and 45 to the SDA group where adhesive bridgework was used to provide 10 pairs of occluding contacts. The impact of treatment on OHrQOL was used as the primary outcome measure. Each patient completed the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) at baseline, 1, 6, 12 and 24 months after treatment. Both treatment groups reported improvements in OHIP-14 scores at 24 months (p<0.05). For the SDA group OHIP-14 scores improved by 8.0 scale points at 12 months (p<0.001) and 5.9 scale points at 24 months (p<0.05). For the RPD group OHIP-14 scores improved by 5.7 scale points at 12 months (p<0.05) and 4.2 scale points at 24 months (p<0.05). Analysis using ANCOVA showed that there were significant between group differences recorded in both treatment centres. 24 months after intervention the SDA group recorded better OHIP-14 scores by an average of 2.9 points in CUDH (p<0.0001) and by an average of 7.9 points in SFDH (p<0.0001) compared to the RPD group. Patients in the SDA group maintained their improvements in OHrQOL scores throughout the 24 month study period. For the RPD group the initial improvement in OHrQOL score began to diminish after 6 months, particularly for those treated in SFDH. Thus, the benefits of functionally orientated treatment increased over time, particularly for the older, more systemically unwell cohort in SFDH.
    • The importance of oral health for the systemic well being of an ageing population.

      McKenna, G; Allen, P F; O'Mahony, D; DaMata, C; Cronin, M; Woods, N (2011-02-22)