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dc.contributor.authorCully, G
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-18T16:11:47Z
dc.date.available2011-02-18T16:11:47Z
dc.date.issued2010-09
dc.identifier.citationAre pregnant women receiving support for smoking dependence when attending routine antenatal appointments? 2010, 103 (8):239-41 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102
dc.identifier.pmid21046864
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/122294
dc.description.abstractEarly and consistent intervention with pregnant smokers can reduce the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with smoking during pregnancy. A survey of 470 pregnant women was conducted to establish the care they received in relation to smoking whilst attending routine public antenatal appointments. The overall prevalence of smoking was 23.5%. Age, level of education and nationality were associated with smoking status with younger, less educated Irish women being most likely to smoke. Women attending for their first visit were much more likely to be asked about their smoking status 71 (85.5) versus 68 (17.8) and advised to quit if they were smokers 11 (73.3) versus 11 (15.7). None of the women were offered specific assistance to help them stop smoking or had a follow-up appointment arranged specifically to do with smoking. 167 women (35.6) were exposed to passive smoking in their own homes.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavior
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIreland
dc.subject.meshPregnancy
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Care
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.subject.meshSmoking
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleAre pregnant women receiving support for smoking dependence when attending routine antenatal appointments?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Promotion Service, 52 Broomhill Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. geraldine.cully@hse.ieen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T11:05:00Z
html.description.abstractEarly and consistent intervention with pregnant smokers can reduce the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with smoking during pregnancy. A survey of 470 pregnant women was conducted to establish the care they received in relation to smoking whilst attending routine public antenatal appointments. The overall prevalence of smoking was 23.5%. Age, level of education and nationality were associated with smoking status with younger, less educated Irish women being most likely to smoke. Women attending for their first visit were much more likely to be asked about their smoking status 71 (85.5) versus 68 (17.8) and advised to quit if they were smokers 11 (73.3) versus 11 (15.7). None of the women were offered specific assistance to help them stop smoking or had a follow-up appointment arranged specifically to do with smoking. 167 women (35.6) were exposed to passive smoking in their own homes.


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