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  • Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with pre-existing anxiety disorders attending secondary care.

    Plunkett, R; Costello, S; McGovern, M; McDonald, C; Hallahan, B (2020-06-08)
    Objectives: To examine the psychological and social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with established anxiety disorders during a period of stringent mandated social restrictions. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 individuals attending the Galway-Roscommon Mental Health Services with an International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of an anxiety disorder to determine the impact of the COVID-19 restrictions on anxiety and mood symptoms, social and occupational functioning and quality of life. Results: Twelve (40.0%) participants described COVID-19 restrictions as having a deleterious impact on their anxiety symptoms. Likert scale measurements noted that the greatest impact of COVID-19 related to social functioning (mean = 4.5, SD = 2.9), with a modest deleterious effect on anxiety symptoms noted (mean = 3.8, SD = 2.9). Clinician rated data noted that 8 (26.7%) participants had disimproved and 14 (46.7%) participants had improved since their previous clinical review, prior to commencement of COVID-19 restrictions. Conditions associated with no 'trigger', such as generalised anxiety disorder, demonstrated a non-significant increase in anxiety symptoms compared to conditions with a 'trigger', such as obsessive compulsive disorder. Psychiatric or physical comorbidity did not substantially impact on symptomatology secondary to COVID-19 mandated restrictions. Conclusions: The psychological and social impact of COVID-19 restrictions on individuals with pre-existing anxiety disorders has been modest with only minimal increases in symptomatology or social impairment noted.
  • Uropathogenic Biofilm-Forming Capabilities are not Predictable from Clinical Details or from Colonial Morphology.

    Whelan, Shane; O'Grady, Mary Claire; Corcoran, Dan; Finn, Karen; Lucey, Brigid (2020-04-30)
    Antibiotic resistance is increasing to an extent where efficacy is not guaranteed when treating infection. Biofilm formation has been shown to complicate treatment, whereby the formation of biofilm is associated with higher minimum inhibitory concentration values of antibiotic. The objective of the current paper was to determine whether biofilm formation is variable among uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates and whether formation is associated with recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and whether it can be predicted by phenotypic appearance on culture medium A total of 62 E. coli isolates that were reported as the causative agent of UTI were studied (33 from patients denoted as having recurrent UTI and 29 from patients not specified as having recurrent UTI). The biofilm forming capability was determined using a standard microtitre plate method, using E. coli ATCC 25922 as the positive control. The majority of isolates (93.6%) were found to be biofilm formers, whereby 81% were denoted as strong or very strong producers of biofilm when compared to the positive control. Through the use of a Wilcox test, the difference in biofilm forming propensity between the two patient populations was found to not be statistically significant (p = 0.5). Furthermore, it was noted that colony morphology was not a reliable predictor of biofilm-forming propensity. The findings of this study indicate that biofilm formation is very common among uropathogens, and they suggest that the biofilm-forming capability might be considered when treating UTI. Clinical details indicating a recurrent infection were not predictors of biofilm formation.
  • NMIC Bulletin Sept 2020, Vol 26 No 2: Useful Medicines information resources for Healthcare Professionals

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-09)
    Bulletin
  • NMIC bulletin Dec 2020, Vol 26; No. 3: Drug Interactions (1) – General Principles

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-12)
    Bulletin
  • Haematological parameters and coagulation in umbilical cord blood following COVID-19 infection in pregnancy.

    Murphy, Claire A; O'Reilly, Daniel P; Edebiri, Osasere; Weiss, Luisa; Cullivan, Sarah; EL-Khuffash, Afif; Doyle, Emma; Donnelly, Jennifer C; Malone, Fergal D; Ferguson, Wendy; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-09-21)
    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate infants, born to women with SARS-CoV-2 detected during pregnancy, for evidence of haematological abnormalities or hypercoagulability in umbilical cord blood. Study design: This was a prospective observational case-control study of infants born to women who had SARS-CoV-2 RNA detected by PCR at any time during their pregnancy (n = 15). The study was carried out in a Tertiary University Maternity Hospital (8,500 deliveries/year) in Ireland. This study was approved by the Hospital Research Ethics Committee and written consent was obtained. Umbilical cord blood samples were collected at delivery, full blood count and Calibrated Automated Thrombography were performed. Demographics and clinical outcomes were recorded. Healthy term infants, previously recruited as controls to a larger study prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, were the historical control population (n = 10). Results: Infants born to women with SARS-CoV-2 had similar growth parameters (birth weight 3600 g v 3680 g, p = 0.83) and clinical outcomes to healthy controls, such as need for resuscitation at birth (2 (13.3%) v 1 (10%), p = 1.0) and NICU admission (1 (6.7%) v 2 (20%), p = 0.54). Haematological parameters (Haemoglobin, platelet, white cell and lymphocyte counts) in the COVID-19 group were all within normal neonatal reference ranges. Calibrated Automated Thrombography revealed no differences in any thrombin generation parameters (lag time (p = 0.92), endogenous thrombin potential (p = 0.24), peak thrombin (p = 0.44), time to peak thrombin (p = 0.94)) between the two groups. Conclusion: In this prospective study including eligible cases in a very large population of approximately 1500 women, there was no evidence of derangement of the haematological parameters or hypercoagulability in umbilical cord blood due to COVID-19. Further research is required to investigate the pathological placental changes, particularly COVID-19 placentitis and the impact of different strains of SARS-CoV-2 (particularly the B.1.1.7 and the emerging Delta variant) and the severity and timing of infection on the developing fetus.
  • Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standard Versus a Modified Low-Phosphorus Diet in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Byrne, Fiona N; Gillman, Barbara A; Kiely, Mairead; Palmer, Brendan; Shiely, Frances; Kearney, Patricia M; Earlie, Joyce; Bowles, Maria B; Keohane, Fiona M; Connolly, Pauline P; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-08-18)
    There was no significant difference in the change in serum phosphate between the standard and modified diets. Although total dietary phosphorus intake was similar, phytate-bound phosphorus, found in pulses, nuts, and whole grains, was significantly higher in the modified diet (P < 0.001). Dietary fiber intake was also significantly higher (P < 0.003), as was the percentage of patients reporting an increase in bowel movements while following the modified diet (P = 0.008). There was no significant difference in the change in serum potassium or in reported protein intake between the 2 diets. Both diets were similarly well tolerated.
  • Systemic Molecular Mediators of Inflammation Differentiate Between Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, Implicating Threshold Levels of IL-10 and Relative Ratios of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines in Therapy.

    Health Service Executive; Kiernan, Miranda G; Coffey, J Calvin; Sahebally, Shaheel M; Tibbitts, Paul; Lyons, Emma M; O'leary, Eimear; Owolabi, Funke; Dunne, Colum P; Graduate Entry Medical School and Centre for Interventions in Infection, Inflammation & Immunity [4i], University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. 2Department of Surgery, University Hospital Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. (Oxford University Press, 2019-06-26)
  • Therapeutics Today September 2020

    National Medicines Information Centre; St James's Hospital (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-09)
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today July 2021 Number 7

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-07
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today January 2021 Number 1

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-01)
    NewSLETTER
  • Therapeutics Today February 2021 Number 2

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-02
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today August 2021 Number 8

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-08
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today June 2021 Number 6

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-06
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today September 2021 Number 9

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-09
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today April 2021 Number 4

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-04
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today March 2021 Number 3

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-03
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today December 2020 Number 12

    National Medicines Information Centre (National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2020-12)
    Newsletter
  • Therapeutics Today May 2021 Number 5

    National Medicines Information Centre, St James's Hospital (SJ) Dublin 8, 2021-05
    Newsletter

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