Cocaine-related admissions to an intensive care unit: a five-year study of incidence and outcomes.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/99120
Title:
Cocaine-related admissions to an intensive care unit: a five-year study of incidence and outcomes.
Authors:
Galvin, S; Campbell, M; Marsh, B; O'Brien, B
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. sineadagalvin@yahoo.ie
Citation:
Cocaine-related admissions to an intensive care unit: a five-year study of incidence and outcomes. 2010, 65 (2):163-6 Anaesthesia
Journal:
Anaesthesia
Issue Date:
Feb-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/99120
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2044.2009.06189.x
PubMed ID:
19930217
Abstract:
Cocaine misuse is increasing and it is evidently considered a relatively safe drug of abuse in Ireland. To address this perception, we reviewed the database of an 18-bed Dublin intensive care unit, covering all admissions from 2003 to 2007. We identified cocaine-related cases, measuring hospital mortality and long-term survival in early 2009. Cocaine-related admissions increased from around one annually in 2003-05 to 10 in 2007. Their median (IQR [range]) age was 25 (21-35 [17-47]) years and 78% were male. The median (IQR [range]) APACHE II score was 16 (11-27 [5-36]) and length of intensive care stay was 5 (3-9 [1-16]) days. Ten patients died during their hospital stay. A further five had died by the time of follow-up, a median of 24 months later. One was untraceable. Cocaine toxicity necessitating intensive care is increasingly common in Dublin. Hospital mortality in this series was 52%. These findings may help to inform public attitudes to cocaine.
Item Type:
Preprint
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Cocaine; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Epidemiologic Methods; Female; Hospital Mortality; Hospitalization; Humans; Intensive Care Units; Ireland; Length of Stay; Male; Middle Aged; Prognosis; Young Adult
ISSN:
1365-2044

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, Sen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Men
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Ben
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-18T13:25:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-18T13:25:56Z-
dc.date.issued2010-02-
dc.identifier.citationCocaine-related admissions to an intensive care unit: a five-year study of incidence and outcomes. 2010, 65 (2):163-6 Anaesthesiaen
dc.identifier.issn1365-2044-
dc.identifier.pmid19930217-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2044.2009.06189.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/99120-
dc.description.abstractCocaine misuse is increasing and it is evidently considered a relatively safe drug of abuse in Ireland. To address this perception, we reviewed the database of an 18-bed Dublin intensive care unit, covering all admissions from 2003 to 2007. We identified cocaine-related cases, measuring hospital mortality and long-term survival in early 2009. Cocaine-related admissions increased from around one annually in 2003-05 to 10 in 2007. Their median (IQR [range]) age was 25 (21-35 [17-47]) years and 78% were male. The median (IQR [range]) APACHE II score was 16 (11-27 [5-36]) and length of intensive care stay was 5 (3-9 [1-16]) days. Ten patients died during their hospital stay. A further five had died by the time of follow-up, a median of 24 months later. One was untraceable. Cocaine toxicity necessitating intensive care is increasingly common in Dublin. Hospital mortality in this series was 52%. These findings may help to inform public attitudes to cocaine.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCocaine-
dc.subject.meshCocaine-Related Disorders-
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methods-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHospital Mortality-
dc.subject.meshHospitalization-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPrognosis-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleCocaine-related admissions to an intensive care unit: a five-year study of incidence and outcomes.en
dc.typePreprinten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. sineadagalvin@yahoo.ieen
dc.identifier.journalAnaesthesiaen
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