Reconnecting with life: reconnecting with self, others and time. A grounded theory study of recovering from mental health problems in an Irish context

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/97837
Title:
Reconnecting with life: reconnecting with self, others and time. A grounded theory study of recovering from mental health problems in an Irish context
Other Titles:
A thesis submitted by Yulia Kartalova-O’Doherty, M.A., M.Sc. for a Ph.D. in psychosocial health at the School of Nursing, Dublin City University
Authors:
Kartalova O' Doherty, Yulia
Affiliation:
Health Research Board (HRB)
Publisher:
Dublin City University
Issue Date:
Jan-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/97837
Additional Links:
http://doras.dcu.ie/15081/
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
It has been recommended that Irish mental health services adopt a recovery perspective (Department of Health and Children 2006). However there is no unified theory of recovery capable of guiding services (Craig 2008). The aim of this study was to develop a coherent theory of recovering from mental health problems. This was the first grounded theory study of recovery in Ireland. The study methodology was guided by critical realism and classical grounded theory. The study was based on open-ended individual interviews with 32 volunteers who had experienced mental health problems more than once over a period of two years and considered themselves in improvement. Most participants (n=23) were recruited via mental health services, and nine via peer support or community groups. The core category of recovery was labelled as ‘re-connecting with life‘. It had three interactive subcategories: 1) reconnecting with self through accepting the self as a worthy human being capable of positive change; 2) reconnecting self with others through empathic, accepting, and validating connection; 3) reconnecting self with others and time, through establishing coherence of one’s past and actively shaping and executing one’s present and future. Synchronising self and others in time was reported as an important goal and tool of reconnecting with life, and was achieved through talking, understanding, empathy and giving back. This study shows that through on-judgemental and accepting connection with peers or service providers persons can relearn to understand and value themselves and others, come to terms with the past, and plan and execute their present and future. This study provides evidence that through a dynamic connection with self, others and time one can regain meaningfulness of one’s life, which was found to be crucial for physical and mental health. Implications for mental health policy, practice, education and research are provided.
Keywords:
MENTAL HEALTH; FAMILY SUPPORT

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKartalova O' Doherty, Yuliaen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-04T10:56:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-04T10:56:27Z-
dc.date.issued2010-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/97837-
dc.descriptionIt has been recommended that Irish mental health services adopt a recovery perspective (Department of Health and Children 2006). However there is no unified theory of recovery capable of guiding services (Craig 2008). The aim of this study was to develop a coherent theory of recovering from mental health problems. This was the first grounded theory study of recovery in Ireland. The study methodology was guided by critical realism and classical grounded theory. The study was based on open-ended individual interviews with 32 volunteers who had experienced mental health problems more than once over a period of two years and considered themselves in improvement. Most participants (n=23) were recruited via mental health services, and nine via peer support or community groups. The core category of recovery was labelled as ‘re-connecting with life‘. It had three interactive subcategories: 1) reconnecting with self through accepting the self as a worthy human being capable of positive change; 2) reconnecting self with others through empathic, accepting, and validating connection; 3) reconnecting self with others and time, through establishing coherence of one’s past and actively shaping and executing one’s present and future. Synchronising self and others in time was reported as an important goal and tool of reconnecting with life, and was achieved through talking, understanding, empathy and giving back. This study shows that through on-judgemental and accepting connection with peers or service providers persons can relearn to understand and value themselves and others, come to terms with the past, and plan and execute their present and future. This study provides evidence that through a dynamic connection with self, others and time one can regain meaningfulness of one’s life, which was found to be crucial for physical and mental health. Implications for mental health policy, practice, education and research are provided.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin City Universityen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doras.dcu.ie/15081/en
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectFAMILY SUPPORTen
dc.titleReconnecting with life: reconnecting with self, others and time. A grounded theory study of recovering from mental health problems in an Irish contexten
dc.title.alternativeA thesis submitted by Yulia Kartalova-O’Doherty, M.A., M.Sc. for a Ph.D. in psychosocial health at the School of Nursing, Dublin City Universityen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Research Board (HRB)en
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