Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/97298
Title:
Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.
Authors:
Hashem, Atef A; O'Connell, Brian; Nunn, June; O'Connell, Anne; Garvey, Therese; O'Sullivan, Michael
Affiliation:
Division of Restorative Dentistry & Periodontology, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2.
Citation:
Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders., 56 (1):23-7 J Ir Dent Assoc
Journal:
Journal of the Irish Dental Association
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/97298
PubMed ID:
20337142
Abstract:
PURPOSE: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Details of 168 patients with hypodontia referred during the period 2002-2006 were entered in a database designed as a national record. Tooth charting was completed using clinical and radiographic examinations. The age of patients ranged from 7-50 years, with a median age of 20 years (Mean: 21.79; SD: 8.005). RESULTS: Hypodontia referrals constituted 65.5% of the total referrals. Females were more commonly affected than males with a ratio of 1.3:1. The number of referrals reflected the population density in this area; the majority were referrals from the public dental service. Mandibular second premolars were the most commonly missing teeth, followed by maxillary second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors; maxillary central incisors were the least affected. Symmetry of tooth agenesis between the right and left sides was an evident feature. Slightly more teeth were missing on the left side (n = 725) than on the right side (n = 706) and in the maxillary arch (n = 768) as compared to the mandibular arch (n = 663). Some 54% of patients had severe hypodontia with more than six teeth missing; 32% had moderate hypodontia, with four to six teeth missing. The most common pattern of tooth agenesis was four missing teeth. CONCLUSION: Hypodontia was a common presentation in a population referred to this tertiary care clinic. The pattern and distribution of tooth agenesis in Irish patients appears to follow the patterns reported in the literature.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Anodontia; Bicuspid; Child; Databases, Factual; Dental Care for Chronically Ill; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Referral and Consultation; Sex Ratio; Young Adult
ISSN:
0021-1133

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHashem, Atef Aen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Brianen
dc.contributor.authorNunn, Juneen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorGarvey, Thereseen
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-23T13:48:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-23T13:48:54Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationTooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders., 56 (1):23-7 J Ir Dent Assocen
dc.identifier.issn0021-1133-
dc.identifier.pmid20337142-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/97298-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Details of 168 patients with hypodontia referred during the period 2002-2006 were entered in a database designed as a national record. Tooth charting was completed using clinical and radiographic examinations. The age of patients ranged from 7-50 years, with a median age of 20 years (Mean: 21.79; SD: 8.005). RESULTS: Hypodontia referrals constituted 65.5% of the total referrals. Females were more commonly affected than males with a ratio of 1.3:1. The number of referrals reflected the population density in this area; the majority were referrals from the public dental service. Mandibular second premolars were the most commonly missing teeth, followed by maxillary second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors; maxillary central incisors were the least affected. Symmetry of tooth agenesis between the right and left sides was an evident feature. Slightly more teeth were missing on the left side (n = 725) than on the right side (n = 706) and in the maxillary arch (n = 768) as compared to the mandibular arch (n = 663). Some 54% of patients had severe hypodontia with more than six teeth missing; 32% had moderate hypodontia, with four to six teeth missing. The most common pattern of tooth agenesis was four missing teeth. CONCLUSION: Hypodontia was a common presentation in a population referred to this tertiary care clinic. The pattern and distribution of tooth agenesis in Irish patients appears to follow the patterns reported in the literature.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnodontia-
dc.subject.meshBicuspid-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factual-
dc.subject.meshDental Care for Chronically Ill-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshReferral and Consultation-
dc.subject.meshSex Ratio-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleTooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Restorative Dentistry & Periodontology, Dublin Dental School & Hospital, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Irish Dental Associationen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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