Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/95252
Title:
vCJD risk in the Republic of Ireland.
Authors:
Harney, Michael S; Ghani, Azra C; Donnelly, C A; Walsh, Rory McConn; Walsh, Michael; Howley, Rachel; Brett, Francesca; Farrell, Michael
Affiliation:
CJD Surveillance Unit, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. michaelsharney@eircom.net
Citation:
vCJD risk in the Republic of Ireland. 2003, 3:28 BMC Infect. Dis.
Journal:
BMC infectious diseases
Issue Date:
26-Nov-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/95252
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2334-3-28
PubMed ID:
14641933
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The Republic of Ireland has the second highest incidence of BSE worldwide. Only a single case of vCJD has been identified to date. METHODS: We estimate the total future number of clinical cases of vCJD using an established mathematical model, and based on infectivity of bovine tissue calculated from UK data and on the relative exposure to BSE contaminated meat. RESULTS: We estimate 1 future clinical case (95% CI 0-15) of vCJD in the Republic of Ireland. Irish exposure is from BSE infected indigenous beef products and from imported UK beef products. Additionally, 2.5% of the Irish population was exposed to UK beef through residing in the UK during the 'at-risk' period. The relative proportion of risk attributable to each of these three exposures individually is 2:2:1 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The low numbers of future vCJD cases estimated in this study is reassuring for the Irish population and for other countries with a similar level of BSE exposure.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Animals; Cattle; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome; Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform; Food Contamination; Humans; Incidence; Ireland; Meat Products; Models, Biological; Risk Factors
ISSN:
1471-2334

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarney, Michael Sen
dc.contributor.authorGhani, Azra Cen
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, C Aen
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Rory McConnen
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorHowley, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorBrett, Francescaen
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-30T14:19:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-30T14:19:33Z-
dc.date.issued2003-11-26-
dc.identifier.citationvCJD risk in the Republic of Ireland. 2003, 3:28 BMC Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334-
dc.identifier.pmid14641933-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2334-3-28-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/95252-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The Republic of Ireland has the second highest incidence of BSE worldwide. Only a single case of vCJD has been identified to date. METHODS: We estimate the total future number of clinical cases of vCJD using an established mathematical model, and based on infectivity of bovine tissue calculated from UK data and on the relative exposure to BSE contaminated meat. RESULTS: We estimate 1 future clinical case (95% CI 0-15) of vCJD in the Republic of Ireland. Irish exposure is from BSE infected indigenous beef products and from imported UK beef products. Additionally, 2.5% of the Irish population was exposed to UK beef through residing in the UK during the 'at-risk' period. The relative proportion of risk attributable to each of these three exposures individually is 2:2:1 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The low numbers of future vCJD cases estimated in this study is reassuring for the Irish population and for other countries with a similar level of BSE exposure.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCattle-
dc.subject.meshCreutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome-
dc.subject.meshEncephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform-
dc.subject.meshFood Contamination-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMeat Products-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.titlevCJD risk in the Republic of Ireland.en
dc.contributor.departmentCJD Surveillance Unit, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. michaelsharney@eircom.neten
dc.identifier.journalBMC infectious diseasesen

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