Can a web portal enhance collaboration between speech and language therapists and primary school teachers? / [thesis] Duana Quigley

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/95043
Title:
Can a web portal enhance collaboration between speech and language therapists and primary school teachers? / [thesis] Duana Quigley
Other Titles:
A dissertation submitted to the University of Dublin, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Health Informatics
Authors:
Quigley, Duana
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
University of Dublin Trinity College (TCD)
Issue Date:
10-May-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/95043
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
The objective of this study was to explore if the introduction of a web portal could potentially enhance collaboration between Speech and Language Therapists (SLTs) and teachers. No such web portal currently exists. A qualitative methodology was used with the aim of obtaining a deeper insight into the beliefs, perceptions and experiences of the participants including: what influences collaboration; what are the advantages and disadvantages of collaboration; what elements do SLTs and teachers consider necessary to be included in the design of a web portal to enhance collaboration; and what are the potential advantages, disadvantages and barriers to the use of a web portal for collaboration. The data collected from twenty-four semi-structured interviews was analysed through a six-stage process of thematic analysis, as described by Attride-Stirling (2001). Four Global Themes were extracted from the data: desired specifications of the web portal; potential incentives to use the web portal; potential disincentives to use the web portal; and supports that could facilitate optimal use of the web portal. The desired specifications expressed by the informants included informational elements, supplementing a child’s SLT record, supplementing school records, easy access to resources and links to other professionals and services. Potential incentives consisted of the advantages and benefits of collaboration, enabling more regular contact, having a written record of collaborative attempts, easier access to resources and information, increasing understanding of each profession’s role, cost-savings, fostering positive relationships and integrating SLTs more into the education setting. Potential disincentives comprised of lack of funding for IT equipment and development of a web portal, lack of IT skills and knowledge, concerns around security, lack of time to use it due to existing workloads, a perception that it may not be necessary to collaborate for some children, and personality and attitudes. Supports that could facilitate optimal use included funding, training, IT support, supportive organisational structures v i and policies, and having the web portal supplemented by other oral methods of communication. The findings support previous investigations on the benefits and barriers to collaboration between SLTs and teachers. Furthermore, it has emphasised the perception of Irish SLTs and teachers that changes are needed to their current haphazard collaborative practices and the perception that blurring of boundaries between health and education are required. No previous studies have explored the potential use of web portal for collaboration between SLTs and teachers. Hence, this study has provided the opinions of both professions on this innovative topic and added knowledge to both interest groups on the feasibility of using a web portal for collaboration and how it could be facilitated to maximise its advantages and minimise the obstacles. On the whole, the findings have indicated that SLTs and teachers would eagerly support the introduction of a web portal to enhance existing collaborative practices, but not to completely replace them. This was accounted for by an overwhelming majority feeling that face-to-face communication is superior and cannot be replaced by written or virtual communication, and a reluctance to put sensitive information in a written format. Furthermore, this research study has clearly outlined the desired specifications for the web portal based on consultation with the intended users, thus providing a platform from where design and implementation could commence. The designers and implementers would also benefit from the study’s findings in relation to potential incentives and disincentives, and supports that could facilitate optimal use of the web portal. Moreover, this research study provides direction for an iterative, multi-factorial evaluation that will be a vital component of the web portal implementation. Thus, ensuring the most successful adoption of this innovative proposal.
Keywords:
TEACHER; TEACHING MATERIAL; INFORMATICS; INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY; INTERNET
Local subject classification:
SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY; SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPISTS; COLLORATION; WEB PORTAL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Duanaen
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-26T12:48:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-26T12:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2009-05-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/95043-
dc.descriptionThe objective of this study was to explore if the introduction of a web portal could potentially enhance collaboration between Speech and Language Therapists (SLTs) and teachers. No such web portal currently exists. A qualitative methodology was used with the aim of obtaining a deeper insight into the beliefs, perceptions and experiences of the participants including: what influences collaboration; what are the advantages and disadvantages of collaboration; what elements do SLTs and teachers consider necessary to be included in the design of a web portal to enhance collaboration; and what are the potential advantages, disadvantages and barriers to the use of a web portal for collaboration. The data collected from twenty-four semi-structured interviews was analysed through a six-stage process of thematic analysis, as described by Attride-Stirling (2001). Four Global Themes were extracted from the data: desired specifications of the web portal; potential incentives to use the web portal; potential disincentives to use the web portal; and supports that could facilitate optimal use of the web portal. The desired specifications expressed by the informants included informational elements, supplementing a child’s SLT record, supplementing school records, easy access to resources and links to other professionals and services. Potential incentives consisted of the advantages and benefits of collaboration, enabling more regular contact, having a written record of collaborative attempts, easier access to resources and information, increasing understanding of each profession’s role, cost-savings, fostering positive relationships and integrating SLTs more into the education setting. Potential disincentives comprised of lack of funding for IT equipment and development of a web portal, lack of IT skills and knowledge, concerns around security, lack of time to use it due to existing workloads, a perception that it may not be necessary to collaborate for some children, and personality and attitudes. Supports that could facilitate optimal use included funding, training, IT support, supportive organisational structures v i and policies, and having the web portal supplemented by other oral methods of communication. The findings support previous investigations on the benefits and barriers to collaboration between SLTs and teachers. Furthermore, it has emphasised the perception of Irish SLTs and teachers that changes are needed to their current haphazard collaborative practices and the perception that blurring of boundaries between health and education are required. No previous studies have explored the potential use of web portal for collaboration between SLTs and teachers. Hence, this study has provided the opinions of both professions on this innovative topic and added knowledge to both interest groups on the feasibility of using a web portal for collaboration and how it could be facilitated to maximise its advantages and minimise the obstacles. On the whole, the findings have indicated that SLTs and teachers would eagerly support the introduction of a web portal to enhance existing collaborative practices, but not to completely replace them. This was accounted for by an overwhelming majority feeling that face-to-face communication is superior and cannot be replaced by written or virtual communication, and a reluctance to put sensitive information in a written format. Furthermore, this research study has clearly outlined the desired specifications for the web portal based on consultation with the intended users, thus providing a platform from where design and implementation could commence. The designers and implementers would also benefit from the study’s findings in relation to potential incentives and disincentives, and supports that could facilitate optimal use of the web portal. Moreover, this research study provides direction for an iterative, multi-factorial evaluation that will be a vital component of the web portal implementation. Thus, ensuring the most successful adoption of this innovative proposal.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Dublin Trinity College (TCD)en
dc.subjectTEACHERen
dc.subjectTEACHING MATERIALen
dc.subjectINFORMATICSen
dc.subjectINFORMATION TECHNOLOGYen
dc.subjectINTERNETen
dc.subject.otherSPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPYen
dc.subject.otherSPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPISTSen
dc.subject.otherCOLLORATIONen
dc.subject.otherWEB PORTALen
dc.titleCan a web portal enhance collaboration between speech and language therapists and primary school teachers? / [thesis] Duana Quigleyen
dc.title.alternativeA dissertation submitted to the University of Dublin, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Health Informaticsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
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