Findings from the survey of 2008 nursing graduates: where are they now?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/94316
Title:
Findings from the survey of 2008 nursing graduates: where are they now?
Other Titles:
Changing practice to support service delivery
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE) Office of the Nursing Services Director
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/94316
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
New graduate registered nurses represent a significant contribution to the supply side of nursing human resource planning. Because they are new to the profession, they have specific needs that should not be overlooked. Of equal importance is maintaining equilibrium between the national nursing workforce supply and the demand for new graduate nurses. This equilibrium requires that suffi cient employment opportunities exist for new graduates and that these opportunities are aligned with current service need in a complex dynamic and evolving healthcare system. There is no doubt that the equilibrium between the supply and demand for nurses has fluctuated in recent years and that this will continue until the global labour market stabilises. Consequently, the Health Service Executive (HSE), Offi ce of the Nursing Services Director conducted a second annual survey of graduates who completed a BSc undergraduate education programme in general, psychiatric or intellectual disability nursing in 2008. This survey is similar to one conducted with 2007 nursing graduates, the results of which are included in this report to provide a comparison. In both years, the survey was administered within fourteen months of graduation, using a quantitative exploratory survey study method to examine graduates’ employment trends, including their experience seeking initial work, their current employment status and their initial nursing practice experience. In 2009, the Survey of 2008 Nursing Graduates was distributed to a total of 1,421 graduates who completed a BSc undergraduate education programme in general, psychiatric or intellectual disability nursing in 2008, of which 592 (42%) individuals responded to the survey. The fi ndings were positive and encouraging. Survey Highlights Almost every new graduate respondent (98% or n = 580) commenced initial employment as a registered nurse following completion of their BSc undergraduate education studies in nursing, nearly all of whom 558 commenced employment in the Republic of Ireland. Also, at the time of the survey, coincidently 558 reported current employment as a registered nurse [i.e. 517 in the Republic of Ireland and 41 outside the Republic of Ireland]. In addition: • 50% (290) reported that it took less than four weeks to obtain their initial work as a registered nurse. • 44% (256) reported their experience fi nding initial employment was as expected. • Of the 558 new graduates initially employed in the Republic of Ireland: • 49% (271) were employed outside the Dublin area. • 42% (235) were employed within the Dublin area. • 86% (481) reported set whole-time work hours of 37.5 to 39 hours or more per week. • 74% (413) were employed in the public/voluntary health sector. • 68% (379) were employed in acute hospitals. • 91% (507) reported receiving an orientation, although there was variability in the length from “one day or less” (32% or n = 179), “between two to fi ve days” (39% or n = 215), “between 6 to 14 days” (14% or n = 79), and “more than 14 days” (6% or n = 34). • 75% (382) who received an orientation reported it prepared them “satisfactorily” (43% or n = 220), “quite well” (18% or n = 93) or “very well” (14% or n = 69). 7 • Of the 517 who reported current employment in the Republic of Ireland: • 46% (237) were employed outside of the Dublin area. • 45% (234) were employed within the Dublin area. • 88% (456) reported set whole-time work hours of 37.5 to 39 hours or more per week. • 79% (411) were employed in the public/voluntary health sector. • 72% (371) were employed in acute hospitals. • 4% (23) reported seeking registered nurse employment overseas. • 3% (18) reported that they were currently unemployed and seeking work as a nurse. • 5% (32) reported that they were currently undertaking further education [i.e. nursing/midwifery studies (27), non-nursing/midwifery studies (5)]. • 93% (542) reported the BSc undergraduate programme prepared them for their initial position as a nurse. • 59% (348) respondents provided additional comments to support the preparedness of new graduates in the workplace. They highlighted an opportunity for enhanced education during undergraduate studies on pharmacology and medication management (including the intravenous preparation of antibiotics); obtaining greater clinical practice experience during undergraduate studies obtained in Higher Education Institute clinical laboratories and health service settings; suffi cient orientation to the workplace setting for all new graduates; ample support from an assigned knowledgeable preceptor/buddy during the initial weeks of work; the value of sound nursing leadership in the unit; and the importance of being encouraged to ask questions and to be able to obtain guidance from experienced nurses. Although newly qualifi ed nurses cannot be expected to function at the level of an experienced nurse, there is an expectation from both employers and new graduates that they need to be “practice ready” to meet the requirements of the current healthcare setting. To this end, respondents highlighted an opportunity for enhanced education during undergraduate studies and a strong need for obtaining more practical clinical experience during their BSc undergraduate education programme in nursing, this may not necessarily refer to the amount of time the student spends in the clinical area but rather the quality of the time spent. In addition, new graduates also highlighted the need for adequate orientation and clinical practice preceptorship/mentorship support during their initial position.
Keywords:
SURVEY; NURSE; EMPLOYMENT TRENDS
ISBN:
9781906218317

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE) Office of the Nursing Services Directoren
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-16T11:57:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-16T11:57:35Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.isbn9781906218317-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/94316-
dc.descriptionNew graduate registered nurses represent a significant contribution to the supply side of nursing human resource planning. Because they are new to the profession, they have specific needs that should not be overlooked. Of equal importance is maintaining equilibrium between the national nursing workforce supply and the demand for new graduate nurses. This equilibrium requires that suffi cient employment opportunities exist for new graduates and that these opportunities are aligned with current service need in a complex dynamic and evolving healthcare system. There is no doubt that the equilibrium between the supply and demand for nurses has fluctuated in recent years and that this will continue until the global labour market stabilises. Consequently, the Health Service Executive (HSE), Offi ce of the Nursing Services Director conducted a second annual survey of graduates who completed a BSc undergraduate education programme in general, psychiatric or intellectual disability nursing in 2008. This survey is similar to one conducted with 2007 nursing graduates, the results of which are included in this report to provide a comparison. In both years, the survey was administered within fourteen months of graduation, using a quantitative exploratory survey study method to examine graduates’ employment trends, including their experience seeking initial work, their current employment status and their initial nursing practice experience. In 2009, the Survey of 2008 Nursing Graduates was distributed to a total of 1,421 graduates who completed a BSc undergraduate education programme in general, psychiatric or intellectual disability nursing in 2008, of which 592 (42%) individuals responded to the survey. The fi ndings were positive and encouraging. Survey Highlights Almost every new graduate respondent (98% or n = 580) commenced initial employment as a registered nurse following completion of their BSc undergraduate education studies in nursing, nearly all of whom 558 commenced employment in the Republic of Ireland. Also, at the time of the survey, coincidently 558 reported current employment as a registered nurse [i.e. 517 in the Republic of Ireland and 41 outside the Republic of Ireland]. In addition: • 50% (290) reported that it took less than four weeks to obtain their initial work as a registered nurse. • 44% (256) reported their experience fi nding initial employment was as expected. • Of the 558 new graduates initially employed in the Republic of Ireland: • 49% (271) were employed outside the Dublin area. • 42% (235) were employed within the Dublin area. • 86% (481) reported set whole-time work hours of 37.5 to 39 hours or more per week. • 74% (413) were employed in the public/voluntary health sector. • 68% (379) were employed in acute hospitals. • 91% (507) reported receiving an orientation, although there was variability in the length from “one day or less” (32% or n = 179), “between two to fi ve days” (39% or n = 215), “between 6 to 14 days” (14% or n = 79), and “more than 14 days” (6% or n = 34). • 75% (382) who received an orientation reported it prepared them “satisfactorily” (43% or n = 220), “quite well” (18% or n = 93) or “very well” (14% or n = 69). 7 • Of the 517 who reported current employment in the Republic of Ireland: • 46% (237) were employed outside of the Dublin area. • 45% (234) were employed within the Dublin area. • 88% (456) reported set whole-time work hours of 37.5 to 39 hours or more per week. • 79% (411) were employed in the public/voluntary health sector. • 72% (371) were employed in acute hospitals. • 4% (23) reported seeking registered nurse employment overseas. • 3% (18) reported that they were currently unemployed and seeking work as a nurse. • 5% (32) reported that they were currently undertaking further education [i.e. nursing/midwifery studies (27), non-nursing/midwifery studies (5)]. • 93% (542) reported the BSc undergraduate programme prepared them for their initial position as a nurse. • 59% (348) respondents provided additional comments to support the preparedness of new graduates in the workplace. They highlighted an opportunity for enhanced education during undergraduate studies on pharmacology and medication management (including the intravenous preparation of antibiotics); obtaining greater clinical practice experience during undergraduate studies obtained in Higher Education Institute clinical laboratories and health service settings; suffi cient orientation to the workplace setting for all new graduates; ample support from an assigned knowledgeable preceptor/buddy during the initial weeks of work; the value of sound nursing leadership in the unit; and the importance of being encouraged to ask questions and to be able to obtain guidance from experienced nurses. Although newly qualifi ed nurses cannot be expected to function at the level of an experienced nurse, there is an expectation from both employers and new graduates that they need to be “practice ready” to meet the requirements of the current healthcare setting. To this end, respondents highlighted an opportunity for enhanced education during undergraduate studies and a strong need for obtaining more practical clinical experience during their BSc undergraduate education programme in nursing, this may not necessarily refer to the amount of time the student spends in the clinical area but rather the quality of the time spent. In addition, new graduates also highlighted the need for adequate orientation and clinical practice preceptorship/mentorship support during their initial position.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.subjectSURVEYen
dc.subjectNURSEen
dc.subjectEMPLOYMENT TRENDSen
dc.titleFindings from the survey of 2008 nursing graduates: where are they now?en
dc.title.alternativeChanging practice to support service deliveryen
dc.typeReporten
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