Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/94036
Title:
Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.
Authors:
McGuinness, Martina; Dowling, David
Affiliation:
Department of Science and Health, Institute of Technology Carlow, Kilkenny Road, Carlow, Ireland. Martina.McGuinness@itcarlow.ie
Citation:
Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil. 2009, 6 (8):2226-47 Int J Environ Res Public Health
Journal:
International journal of environmental research and public health
Issue Date:
Aug-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/94036
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph6082226
PubMed ID:
19742157
Abstract:
A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Bacteria; Biodegradation, Environmental; Genetic Engineering; Hazardous Substances; Humans; Organic Chemicals; Plants; Soil Pollutants
ISSN:
1660-4601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcGuinness, Martinaen
dc.contributor.authorDowling, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-10T10:07:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-10T10:07:56Z-
dc.date.issued2009-08-
dc.identifier.citationPlant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil. 2009, 6 (8):2226-47 Int J Environ Res Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601-
dc.identifier.pmid19742157-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph6082226-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/94036-
dc.description.abstractA number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBacteria-
dc.subject.meshBiodegradation, Environmental-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Engineering-
dc.subject.meshHazardous Substances-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshOrganic Chemicals-
dc.subject.meshPlants-
dc.subject.meshSoil Pollutants-
dc.titlePlant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Science and Health, Institute of Technology Carlow, Kilkenny Road, Carlow, Ireland. Martina.McGuinness@itcarlow.ieen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of environmental research and public healthen
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