Toward the use of genomics to study microevolutionary change in bacteria.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/93842
Title:
Toward the use of genomics to study microevolutionary change in bacteria.
Authors:
Falush, Daniel
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Environmental Research Institute, Lee Road, Cork, Ireland. d.falush@ucc.ie
Citation:
Toward the use of genomics to study microevolutionary change in bacteria. 2009, 5 (10):e1000627 PLoS Genet.
Journal:
PLoS genetics
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/93842
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1000627
PubMed ID:
19855823
Abstract:
Bacteria evolve rapidly in response to the environment they encounter. Some environmental changes are experienced numerous times by bacteria from the same population, providing an opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of adaptive evolution. Here I discuss two examples in which the patterns of rapid change provide insight into medically important bacterial phenotypes, namely immune escape by Neisseria meningitidis and host specificity of Campylobacter jejuni. Genomic analysis of populations of bacteria from these species holds great promise but requires appropriate concepts and statistical tools.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Bacteria; Campylobacter Infections; DNA, Bacterial; Environment; Evolution, Molecular; Genome, Bacterial; Genomics; Humans; Meningitis, Meningococcal
ISSN:
1553-7404

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFalush, Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-08T13:08:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-08T13:08:29Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.citationToward the use of genomics to study microevolutionary change in bacteria. 2009, 5 (10):e1000627 PLoS Genet.en
dc.identifier.issn1553-7404-
dc.identifier.pmid19855823-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pgen.1000627-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/93842-
dc.description.abstractBacteria evolve rapidly in response to the environment they encounter. Some environmental changes are experienced numerous times by bacteria from the same population, providing an opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of adaptive evolution. Here I discuss two examples in which the patterns of rapid change provide insight into medically important bacterial phenotypes, namely immune escape by Neisseria meningitidis and host specificity of Campylobacter jejuni. Genomic analysis of populations of bacteria from these species holds great promise but requires appropriate concepts and statistical tools.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBacteria-
dc.subject.meshCampylobacter Infections-
dc.subject.meshDNA, Bacterial-
dc.subject.meshEnvironment-
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecular-
dc.subject.meshGenome, Bacterial-
dc.subject.meshGenomics-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMeningitis, Meningococcal-
dc.titleToward the use of genomics to study microevolutionary change in bacteria.en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology, University College Cork, Environmental Research Institute, Lee Road, Cork, Ireland. d.falush@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS geneticsen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.