Cost-effectiveness of treatments reducing coronary heart disease mortality in Ireland, 2000 to 2010.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/87114
Title:
Cost-effectiveness of treatments reducing coronary heart disease mortality in Ireland, 2000 to 2010.
Authors:
Bennett, Kathleen; Kabir, Zubair; Barry, Michael; Tilson, Lesley; Fidan, Dogan; Shelley, Emer; Capewell, Simon
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. bennettk@tcd.ie
Citation:
Cost-effectiveness of treatments reducing coronary heart disease mortality in Ireland, 2000 to 2010. 2009, 12 (1):10-5notValue Health
Journal:
Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research
Issue Date:
Jan-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/87114
DOI:
10.1111/j.1524-4733.2008.00398.x
PubMed ID:
19040564
Additional Links:
https://auth.athensams.net/?ath_returl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2fLogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26authtype%3dAthens%26authtype%3dAthens%26db%3dmnh%26jid%3dFSN%26scope%3dsite&ath_dspid=EBSCO
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with a large burden of disease in Ireland and is responsible for more than 6000 deaths annually. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of specific CHD treatments in Ireland. METHODS: Irish epidemiological data on patient numbers and median survival in specific groups, plus the uptake, effectiveness, and costs of specific interventions, all stratified by age and sex, were incorporated into a previously validated CHD mortality model, the IMPACT model. This model calculates the number of life-years gained (LYGs) by specific cardiology interventions to generate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) per LYG for each intervention. RESULTS: In 2000, medical and surgical treatments together prevented or postponed approximately 1885 CHD deaths in patients aged 25 to 84 years, and thus generated approximately 14,505 extra life-years (minimum 7270, maximum 22,475). In general, all the cardiac interventions investigated were highly cost-effective in the Irish setting. Aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, spironolactone, and warfarin for specific conditions were the most cost-effective interventions (< euro 3000/LYG), followed by the statins for secondary prevention (< euro 6500/LYG). Revascularization for chronic angina and primary angioplasty for myocardial infarction, although still cost-effective, had the highest ICER (between euro 12,000 and euro 20,000/LYG). CONCLUSIONS: Using a comprehensive standardized methodology, cost-effectiveness ratios in this study clearly favored simple medical treatments for myocardial infarction, secondary prevention, angina, and heart failure.
Language:
en
ISSN:
1524-4733

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Kathleenen
dc.contributor.authorKabir, Zubairen
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorTilson, Lesleyen
dc.contributor.authorFidan, Doganen
dc.contributor.authorShelley, Emeren
dc.contributor.authorCapewell, Simonen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-30T16:15:18Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-30T16:15:18Z-
dc.date.issued2009-01-
dc.identifier.citationCost-effectiveness of treatments reducing coronary heart disease mortality in Ireland, 2000 to 2010. 2009, 12 (1):10-5notValue Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1524-4733-
dc.identifier.pmid19040564-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1524-4733.2008.00398.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/87114-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with a large burden of disease in Ireland and is responsible for more than 6000 deaths annually. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of specific CHD treatments in Ireland. METHODS: Irish epidemiological data on patient numbers and median survival in specific groups, plus the uptake, effectiveness, and costs of specific interventions, all stratified by age and sex, were incorporated into a previously validated CHD mortality model, the IMPACT model. This model calculates the number of life-years gained (LYGs) by specific cardiology interventions to generate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) per LYG for each intervention. RESULTS: In 2000, medical and surgical treatments together prevented or postponed approximately 1885 CHD deaths in patients aged 25 to 84 years, and thus generated approximately 14,505 extra life-years (minimum 7270, maximum 22,475). In general, all the cardiac interventions investigated were highly cost-effective in the Irish setting. Aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, spironolactone, and warfarin for specific conditions were the most cost-effective interventions (< euro 3000/LYG), followed by the statins for secondary prevention (< euro 6500/LYG). Revascularization for chronic angina and primary angioplasty for myocardial infarction, although still cost-effective, had the highest ICER (between euro 12,000 and euro 20,000/LYG). CONCLUSIONS: Using a comprehensive standardized methodology, cost-effectiveness ratios in this study clearly favored simple medical treatments for myocardial infarction, secondary prevention, angina, and heart failure.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://auth.athensams.net/?ath_returl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2fLogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26authtype%3dAthens%26authtype%3dAthens%26db%3dmnh%26jid%3dFSN%26scope%3dsite&ath_dspid=EBSCOen
dc.titleCost-effectiveness of treatments reducing coronary heart disease mortality in Ireland, 2000 to 2010.en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. bennettk@tcd.ieen
dc.identifier.journalValue in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Researchen

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