National children in care inspection report 2008

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/85380
Title:
National children in care inspection report 2008
Authors:
Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA)
Publisher:
Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA)
Issue Date:
4-Nov-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/85380
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Population statistics highlight that there are over 1,056,947 children in Ireland (Central Statistics Office, 2006) for whom the state provides a range of services. In 2008, there were approximately 5,449 children in care in Ireland. Children in care include those who are in voluntary care and those who are in care under care orders.A census of children’s residential services is carried out annually in October and the findings are highlighted in chapter 2 of this report. 89% of children in care are in foster care services, 7% are in residential care and the remaining 4% are in other care arrangements.There has been an increase of 2% in the numbers of children in care from 2007 to 2008, with the greatest increase in the number of children in foster care services. The provision of residential care for children is provided in both the statutory and nonstatutory sectors. 50% of children’s residential services were provided by the nonstatutory sector in 2008 compared with 39% in 2005. At the time of the census in 2008, there were 67 children aged 12 and under residing in residential care.This compares favourably with 2006 statistics, which indicated that the number of children aged 12 and under residing in residential care facilities was 95. However, in keeping with national policy, children of this age should not be placed in residential care unless in exceptional circumstances. The 2008 census highlighted that there were three centres providing accommodation for children aged 16 and under seeking asylum and a further six designated private hostels for young people aged 17 years, all of whom were in the care of the HSE. It is the responsibility of the HSE to meet the needs of children seeking asylum in accordance with the Refugee Act, 1996 (as amended) and the Child Care Act, 1991.The HSE is also responsible for the registration and inspection of centres for separated children seeking asylum. In 2008, only two of the three centres and none of the hostels were registered, a finding which gives rise to concern. Residential care was equally provided by the HSE and private and voluntary organisations in 2008, a decrease in HSE direct provision from previous years.The low occupancy rates of some centres, particularly high support and special care units, may in part have been due to refurbishment.The use of these expensive facilities should be reviewed by the HSE. The inspection methodology for the inspection of HSE children’s residential services and foster care services is outlined in chapter 3 of the report. Children in care play a key role in the inspection process and obtaining their views and perspectives, through the use of individual interviews and questionnaires, are invaluable for inspectors in gaining an insight as to what it is like for children to reside in care services. This report summarises the findings from 38 inspections of children’s residential care services (communitybased residential centres, high support units and special care units) that were undertaken by the Authority’s Children’s InspectionTeam for the year 2008.The findings from the inspection of a HSE foster care service are also summarised.
Keywords:
CHILD CARE; SOCIAL CARE; CHILD IN CARE; CHILD HEALTH SERVICE; RESIDENTIAL CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Information and Quality Authority (HIQA)en
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-05T10:33:33Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-05T10:33:33Z-
dc.date.issued2009-11-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/85380-
dc.descriptionPopulation statistics highlight that there are over 1,056,947 children in Ireland (Central Statistics Office, 2006) for whom the state provides a range of services. In 2008, there were approximately 5,449 children in care in Ireland. Children in care include those who are in voluntary care and those who are in care under care orders.A census of children’s residential services is carried out annually in October and the findings are highlighted in chapter 2 of this report. 89% of children in care are in foster care services, 7% are in residential care and the remaining 4% are in other care arrangements.There has been an increase of 2% in the numbers of children in care from 2007 to 2008, with the greatest increase in the number of children in foster care services. The provision of residential care for children is provided in both the statutory and nonstatutory sectors. 50% of children’s residential services were provided by the nonstatutory sector in 2008 compared with 39% in 2005. At the time of the census in 2008, there were 67 children aged 12 and under residing in residential care.This compares favourably with 2006 statistics, which indicated that the number of children aged 12 and under residing in residential care facilities was 95. However, in keeping with national policy, children of this age should not be placed in residential care unless in exceptional circumstances. The 2008 census highlighted that there were three centres providing accommodation for children aged 16 and under seeking asylum and a further six designated private hostels for young people aged 17 years, all of whom were in the care of the HSE. It is the responsibility of the HSE to meet the needs of children seeking asylum in accordance with the Refugee Act, 1996 (as amended) and the Child Care Act, 1991.The HSE is also responsible for the registration and inspection of centres for separated children seeking asylum. In 2008, only two of the three centres and none of the hostels were registered, a finding which gives rise to concern. Residential care was equally provided by the HSE and private and voluntary organisations in 2008, a decrease in HSE direct provision from previous years.The low occupancy rates of some centres, particularly high support and special care units, may in part have been due to refurbishment.The use of these expensive facilities should be reviewed by the HSE. The inspection methodology for the inspection of HSE children’s residential services and foster care services is outlined in chapter 3 of the report. Children in care play a key role in the inspection process and obtaining their views and perspectives, through the use of individual interviews and questionnaires, are invaluable for inspectors in gaining an insight as to what it is like for children to reside in care services. This report summarises the findings from 38 inspections of children’s residential care services (communitybased residential centres, high support units and special care units) that were undertaken by the Authority’s Children’s InspectionTeam for the year 2008.The findings from the inspection of a HSE foster care service are also summarised.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Information and Quality Authority (HIQA)en
dc.subjectCHILD CAREen
dc.subjectSOCIAL CAREen
dc.subjectCHILD IN CAREen
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTH SERVICEen
dc.subjectRESIDENTIAL CAREen
dc.titleNational children in care inspection report 2008en
dc.typeReporten
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