Child protection conferences - the parents’ perspective a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the MSc in child protection and welfare

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/84244
Title:
Child protection conferences - the parents’ perspective a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the MSc in child protection and welfare
Authors:
Guinan, Brendan
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
Trinity College Dublin (TCD)
Issue Date:
31-Aug-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/84244
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
This research project considers a frequently ignored dimension of the child protection system, the parents whose children have been the subject of child abuse concerns. This study focuses on eliciting parents’ views of their experiences of attending at least one child protection conference, at a time when practice has evolved to include parental attendance at the entire meeting. The context for the study is outlined with an account of the history and origins of the child protection conference. The study proceeds to examine the experiences that parents have of the conference process, paying attention to the notion of partnership. Areas of professional social work practice, gender issues, outcomes, the move towards a new model of practice, namely the family group conference, are also explored. Nine parents are interviewed, using a semi-structured in-depth interview method, between seven and twenty-four weeks subsequent to the conference they attended. The purpose of the study is to explore with parents their perceived level of preparation and participation in the conference in addition to determining their view of the outcomes. Respondents were asked if they had recommendations for future conferences. The findings and analysis suggest, from the parents’ perspective, that they are faced with many issues when they attend conferences. These include a lack of preparation and access to professionals’ reports, and intimidation by the presence of large numbers of professionals in addition to their ex-partner and the Gardaí. Respondents point to their belief that they were not listened to and made to feel guilty in the midst of observing unacknowledged tensions in the conference. If the aims of participation are to ensure that parents are empowered through preparation, having access to professionals’ reports, being given opportunity to question professionals’ assessments and offering their views and concerns, this study contends from the parents’ perspective, that this is not happening. The researcher concludes by making recommendations.
Keywords:
CHILD HEALTH; CHILD PROTECTION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGuinan, Brendanen
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-14T15:49:33Z-
dc.date.available2009-10-14T15:49:33Z-
dc.date.issued2004-08-31-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/84244-
dc.descriptionThis research project considers a frequently ignored dimension of the child protection system, the parents whose children have been the subject of child abuse concerns. This study focuses on eliciting parents’ views of their experiences of attending at least one child protection conference, at a time when practice has evolved to include parental attendance at the entire meeting. The context for the study is outlined with an account of the history and origins of the child protection conference. The study proceeds to examine the experiences that parents have of the conference process, paying attention to the notion of partnership. Areas of professional social work practice, gender issues, outcomes, the move towards a new model of practice, namely the family group conference, are also explored. Nine parents are interviewed, using a semi-structured in-depth interview method, between seven and twenty-four weeks subsequent to the conference they attended. The purpose of the study is to explore with parents their perceived level of preparation and participation in the conference in addition to determining their view of the outcomes. Respondents were asked if they had recommendations for future conferences. The findings and analysis suggest, from the parents’ perspective, that they are faced with many issues when they attend conferences. These include a lack of preparation and access to professionals’ reports, and intimidation by the presence of large numbers of professionals in addition to their ex-partner and the Gardaí. Respondents point to their belief that they were not listened to and made to feel guilty in the midst of observing unacknowledged tensions in the conference. If the aims of participation are to ensure that parents are empowered through preparation, having access to professionals’ reports, being given opportunity to question professionals’ assessments and offering their views and concerns, this study contends from the parents’ perspective, that this is not happening. The researcher concludes by making recommendations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin (TCD)en
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen
dc.subjectCHILD PROTECTIONen
dc.titleChild protection conferences - the parents’ perspective a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the MSc in child protection and welfareen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
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