Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/76660
Title:
Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.
Authors:
Jennings, S; Whitford, D L; Carey, D; Smith, S M
Affiliation:
Dept of Public Health Medicine, Health Service Executive, Dr Steevens Hospital, Dublin. siobhan.jennings@mailf.hse.ie
Citation:
Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges., 175 (4):42-7notIr J Med Sci
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
7-Aug-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/76660
PubMed ID:
17312828
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Aged; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Family Practice; Female; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; Humans; Ireland; Male; Medical Audit; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Primary Health Care; Smoking Cessation
ISSN:
0021-1265

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJennings, S-
dc.contributor.authorWhitford, D L-
dc.contributor.authorCarey, D-
dc.contributor.authorSmith, S M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-07T10:52:44Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-07T10:52:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009-08-07T10:52:44Z-
dc.identifier.citationStructuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges., 175 (4):42-7notIr J Med Scien
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265-
dc.identifier.pmid17312828-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/76660-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2-
dc.subject.meshFamily Practice-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHemoglobin A, Glycosylated-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMedical Audit-
dc.subject.meshOutcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)-
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Care-
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation-
dc.titleStructuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDept of Public Health Medicine, Health Service Executive, Dr Steevens Hospital, Dublin. siobhan.jennings@mailf.hse.ieen
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen
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