The open abdomen in trauma and non-trauma patients: WSES guidelines

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/622784
Title:
The open abdomen in trauma and non-trauma patients: WSES guidelines
Authors:
Coccolini, Federico; Roberts, Derek; Ansaloni, Luca; Ivatury, Rao; Gamberini, Emiliano; Kluger, Yoram; Moore, Ernest E; Coimbra, Raul; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Pereira, Bruno M; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Sartelli, Massimo; Velmahos, George; Fraga, Gustavo P; Leppaniemi, Ari; Tolonen, Matti; Galante, Joseph; Razek, Tarek; Maier, Ron; Bala, Miklosh; Sakakushev, Boris; Khokha, Vladimir; Malbrain, Manu; Agnoletti, Vanni; Peitzman, Andrew; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Sugrue, Michael; Di Saverio, Salomone; Martzi, Ingo; Soreide, Kjetil; Biffl, Walter; Ferrada, Paula; Parry, Neil; Montravers, Philippe; Melotti, Rita M; Salvetti, Francesco; Valetti, Tino M; Scalea, Thomas; Chiara, Osvaldo; Cimbanassi, Stefania; Kashuk, Jeffry L; Larrea, Martha; Hernandez, Juan A M; Lin, Heng-Fu; Chirica, Mircea; Arvieux, Catherine; Bing, Camilla; Horer, Tal; De Simone, Belinda; Masiakos, Peter; Reva, Viktor; DeAngelis, Nicola; Kike, Kaoru; Balogh, Zsolt J; Fugazzola, Paola; Tomasoni, Matteo; Latifi, Rifat; Naidoo, Noel; Weber, Dieter; Handolin, Lauri; Inaba, Kenji; Hecker, Andreas; Kuo-Ching, Yuan; Ordoñez, Carlos A; Rizoli, Sandro; Gomes, Carlos A; De Moya, Marc; Wani, Imtiaz; Mefire, Alain C; Boffard, Ken; Napolitano, Lena; Catena, Fausto
Citation:
World Journal of Emergency Surgery. 2018 Feb 02;13(1):7
Issue Date:
2-Feb-2018
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13017-018-0167-4; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/622784
Abstract:
Abstract Damage control resuscitation may lead to postoperative intra-abdominal hypertension or abdominal compartment syndrome. These conditions may result in a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle leading to severe physiologic derangements and multiorgan failure unless interrupted by abdominal (surgical or other) decompression. Further, in some clinical situations, the abdomen cannot be closed due to the visceral edema, the inability to control the compelling source of infection or the necessity to re-explore (as a “planned second-look” laparotomy) or complete previously initiated damage control procedures or in cases of abdominal wall disruption. The open abdomen in trauma and non-trauma patients has been proposed to be effective in preventing or treating deranged physiology in patients with severe injuries or critical illness when no other perceived options exist. Its use, however, remains controversial as it is resource consuming and represents a non-anatomic situation with the potential for severe adverse effects. Its use, therefore, should only be considered in patients who would most benefit from it. Abdominal fascia-to-fascia closure should be done as soon as the patient can physiologically tolerate it. All precautions to minimize complications should be implemented.
Description:
Damage control resuscitation may lead to postoperative intra-abdominal hypertension or abdominal compartment syndrome. These conditions may result in a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle leading to severe physiologic derangements and multiorgan failure unless interrupted by abdominal (surgical or other) decompression. Further, in some clinical situations, the abdomen cannot be closed due to the visceral edema, the inability to control the compelling source of infection or the necessity to re-explore (as a “planned second-look” laparotomy) or complete previously initiated damage control procedures or in cases of abdominal wall disruption. The open abdomen in trauma and non-trauma patients has been proposed to be effective in preventing or treating deranged physiology in patients with severe injuries or critical illness when no other perceived options exist. Its use, however, remains controversial as it is resource consuming and represents a non-anatomic situation with the potential for severe adverse effects. Its use, therefore, should only be considered in patients who would most benefit from it. Abdominal fascia-to-fascia closure should be done as soon as the patient can physiologically tolerate it. All precautions to minimize complications should be implemented
Keywords:
Laparostomy; TRAUMA
Local subject classification:
ABDOMINAL CAVITY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCoccolini, Federicoen
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Dereken
dc.contributor.authorAnsaloni, Lucaen
dc.contributor.authorIvatury, Raoen
dc.contributor.authorGamberini, Emilianoen
dc.contributor.authorKluger, Yoramen
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Ernest Een
dc.contributor.authorCoimbra, Raulen
dc.contributor.authorKirkpatrick, Andrew Wen
dc.contributor.authorPereira, Bruno Men
dc.contributor.authorMontori, Giuliaen
dc.contributor.authorCeresoli, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorAbu-Zidan, Fikri Men
dc.contributor.authorSartelli, Massimoen
dc.contributor.authorVelmahos, Georgeen
dc.contributor.authorFraga, Gustavo Pen
dc.contributor.authorLeppaniemi, Arien
dc.contributor.authorTolonen, Mattien
dc.contributor.authorGalante, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorRazek, Tareken
dc.contributor.authorMaier, Ronen
dc.contributor.authorBala, Mikloshen
dc.contributor.authorSakakushev, Borisen
dc.contributor.authorKhokha, Vladimiren
dc.contributor.authorMalbrain, Manuen
dc.contributor.authorAgnoletti, Vannien
dc.contributor.authorPeitzman, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorDemetrashvili, Zazaen
dc.contributor.authorSugrue, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorDi Saverio, Salomoneen
dc.contributor.authorMartzi, Ingoen
dc.contributor.authorSoreide, Kjetilen
dc.contributor.authorBiffl, Walteren
dc.contributor.authorFerrada, Paulaen
dc.contributor.authorParry, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorMontravers, Philippeen
dc.contributor.authorMelotti, Rita Men
dc.contributor.authorSalvetti, Francescoen
dc.contributor.authorValetti, Tino Men
dc.contributor.authorScalea, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorChiara, Osvaldoen
dc.contributor.authorCimbanassi, Stefaniaen
dc.contributor.authorKashuk, Jeffry Len
dc.contributor.authorLarrea, Marthaen
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Juan A Men
dc.contributor.authorLin, Heng-Fuen
dc.contributor.authorChirica, Mirceaen
dc.contributor.authorArvieux, Catherineen
dc.contributor.authorBing, Camillaen
dc.contributor.authorHorer, Talen
dc.contributor.authorDe Simone, Belindaen
dc.contributor.authorMasiakos, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorReva, Viktoren
dc.contributor.authorDeAngelis, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorKike, Kaoruen
dc.contributor.authorBalogh, Zsolt Jen
dc.contributor.authorFugazzola, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorTomasoni, Matteoen
dc.contributor.authorLatifi, Rifaten
dc.contributor.authorNaidoo, Noelen
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Dieteren
dc.contributor.authorHandolin, Laurien
dc.contributor.authorInaba, Kenjien
dc.contributor.authorHecker, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorKuo-Ching, Yuanen
dc.contributor.authorOrdoñez, Carlos Aen
dc.contributor.authorRizoli, Sandroen
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Carlos Aen
dc.contributor.authorDe Moya, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorWani, Imtiazen
dc.contributor.authorMefire, Alain Cen
dc.contributor.authorBoffard, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorNapolitano, Lenaen
dc.contributor.authorCatena, Faustoen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-09T17:32:59Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-09T17:32:59Z-
dc.date.issued2018-02-02-
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal of Emergency Surgery. 2018 Feb 02;13(1):7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13017-018-0167-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/622784-
dc.descriptionDamage control resuscitation may lead to postoperative intra-abdominal hypertension or abdominal compartment syndrome. These conditions may result in a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle leading to severe physiologic derangements and multiorgan failure unless interrupted by abdominal (surgical or other) decompression. Further, in some clinical situations, the abdomen cannot be closed due to the visceral edema, the inability to control the compelling source of infection or the necessity to re-explore (as a “planned second-look” laparotomy) or complete previously initiated damage control procedures or in cases of abdominal wall disruption. The open abdomen in trauma and non-trauma patients has been proposed to be effective in preventing or treating deranged physiology in patients with severe injuries or critical illness when no other perceived options exist. Its use, however, remains controversial as it is resource consuming and represents a non-anatomic situation with the potential for severe adverse effects. Its use, therefore, should only be considered in patients who would most benefit from it. Abdominal fascia-to-fascia closure should be done as soon as the patient can physiologically tolerate it. All precautions to minimize complications should be implementeden
dc.description.abstractAbstract Damage control resuscitation may lead to postoperative intra-abdominal hypertension or abdominal compartment syndrome. These conditions may result in a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle leading to severe physiologic derangements and multiorgan failure unless interrupted by abdominal (surgical or other) decompression. Further, in some clinical situations, the abdomen cannot be closed due to the visceral edema, the inability to control the compelling source of infection or the necessity to re-explore (as a “planned second-look” laparotomy) or complete previously initiated damage control procedures or in cases of abdominal wall disruption. The open abdomen in trauma and non-trauma patients has been proposed to be effective in preventing or treating deranged physiology in patients with severe injuries or critical illness when no other perceived options exist. Its use, however, remains controversial as it is resource consuming and represents a non-anatomic situation with the potential for severe adverse effects. Its use, therefore, should only be considered in patients who would most benefit from it. Abdominal fascia-to-fascia closure should be done as soon as the patient can physiologically tolerate it. All precautions to minimize complications should be implemented.-
dc.subjectLaparostomyen
dc.subjectTRAUMAen
dc.subject.otherABDOMINAL CAVITYen
dc.titleThe open abdomen in trauma and non-trauma patients: WSES guidelinesen
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s).-
dc.date.updated2018-02-04T04:20:18Z-
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