Comparison of the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen and the SMMSE in screening for mild cognitive impairment.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/620158
Title:
Comparison of the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen and the SMMSE in screening for mild cognitive impairment.
Authors:
O'Caoimh, Rónán; Gao, Yang; McGlade, Ciara; Healy, Liam; Gallagher, Paul; Timmons, Suzanne; Molloy, D William
Citation:
Comparison of the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen and the SMMSE in screening for mild cognitive impairment. 2012, 41 (5):624-9 Age Ageing
Publisher:
Age and ageing
Journal:
Age and ageing
Issue Date:
Sep-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/620158
DOI:
10.1093/ageing/afs059
PubMed ID:
22610464
Abstract:
differentiating mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal cognition (NC) is difficult. The AB Cognitive Screen (ABCS) 135, sensitive in differentiating MCI from dementia, was modified to improve sensitivity and specificity, producing the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen.; this study compared the sensitivity and specificity of the Qmci with the Standardised MMSE and ABCS 135, to differentiate NC, MCI and dementia.; weightings and subtests of the ABCS 135 were changed and a new section 'logical memory' added, creating the Qmci. From four memory clinics in Ontario, Canada, 335 subjects (154 with MCI, 181 with dementia) were recruited and underwent comprehensive assessment. Caregivers, attending with the subjects, without cognitive symptoms, were recruited as controls (n = 630).; the Qmci was more sensitive than the SMMSE and ABCS 135, in differentiating MCI from NC, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 compared with 0.67 and 0.83, respectively, and in differentiating MCI from mild dementia, AUC of 0.92 versus 0.91 and 0.91. The ability of the Qmci to identify MCI was better for those over 75 years.; the Qmci is more sensitive than the SMMSE in differentiating MCI and NC, making it a useful test, for MCI in clinical practice, especially for older adults.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
differentiating mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal cognition (NC) is difficult. The AB Cognitive Screen (ABCS) 135, sensitive in differentiating MCI from dementia, was modified to improve sensitivity and specificity, producing the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen.
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cognition; Female; Humans; Intelligence Tests; Male; Mass Screening; Middle Aged; Mild Cognitive Impairment; Ontario; Retrospective Studies; Sensitivity and Specificity
ISSN:
1468-2834

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Caoimh, Rónánen
dc.contributor.authorGao, Yangen
dc.contributor.authorMcGlade, Ciaraen
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Liamen
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorTimmons, Suzanneen
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, D Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-15T10:33:45Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-15T10:33:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09en
dc.identifier.citationComparison of the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen and the SMMSE in screening for mild cognitive impairment. 2012, 41 (5):624-9 Age Ageingen
dc.identifier.issn1468-2834en
dc.identifier.pmid22610464en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ageing/afs059en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/620158-
dc.descriptiondifferentiating mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal cognition (NC) is difficult. The AB Cognitive Screen (ABCS) 135, sensitive in differentiating MCI from dementia, was modified to improve sensitivity and specificity, producing the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen.en
dc.description.abstractdifferentiating mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal cognition (NC) is difficult. The AB Cognitive Screen (ABCS) 135, sensitive in differentiating MCI from dementia, was modified to improve sensitivity and specificity, producing the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen.en
dc.description.abstractthis study compared the sensitivity and specificity of the Qmci with the Standardised MMSE and ABCS 135, to differentiate NC, MCI and dementia.en
dc.description.abstractweightings and subtests of the ABCS 135 were changed and a new section 'logical memory' added, creating the Qmci. From four memory clinics in Ontario, Canada, 335 subjects (154 with MCI, 181 with dementia) were recruited and underwent comprehensive assessment. Caregivers, attending with the subjects, without cognitive symptoms, were recruited as controls (n = 630).en
dc.description.abstractthe Qmci was more sensitive than the SMMSE and ABCS 135, in differentiating MCI from NC, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 compared with 0.67 and 0.83, respectively, and in differentiating MCI from mild dementia, AUC of 0.92 versus 0.91 and 0.91. The ability of the Qmci to identify MCI was better for those over 75 years.en
dc.description.abstractthe Qmci is more sensitive than the SMMSE in differentiating MCI and NC, making it a useful test, for MCI in clinical practice, especially for older adults.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAge and ageingen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Age and ageingen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshCognitionen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIntelligence Testsen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMass Screeningen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMild Cognitive Impairmenten
dc.subject.meshOntarioen
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificityen
dc.titleComparison of the quick mild cognitive impairment (Qmci) screen and the SMMSE in screening for mild cognitive impairment.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAge and ageingen

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