Knowledge and attitudes of Irish Mental Health Professionals to the concept of recovery from mental illness - five years later.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/619109
Title:
Knowledge and attitudes of Irish Mental Health Professionals to the concept of recovery from mental illness - five years later.
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE); Gaffey, K; Evans, D S; Walsh, F
Citation:
Knowledge and attitudes of Irish Mental Health Professionals to the concept of recovery from mental illness - five years later. 2016: J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Journal:
Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing
Issue Date:
21-Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/619109
DOI:
10.1111/jpm.12325
PubMed ID:
27440748
Abstract:
WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: The Advancing Recovery in Ireland (ARI) project (Health Service Executive, 2012) promotes recovery-orientated services. A previous study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. To facilitate implementation of ARI and monitor progress, this study provided a 'benchmark' of current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The study provides important baseline information on recovery knowledge and attitudes which can be used to assess the impact of the ARI Project. It also provides valuable information that can be compared to recovery approaches employed in other countries. Despite the increased emphasis on recovery in Ireland, knowledge and attitudes of health care practitioners towards recovery remain relatively unchanged between 2007 and 2013. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better RKI scores. Training appears to be the strongest factor in predicting better recovery knowledge. The findings suggest that knowledge levels and attitude changes following education may not be sustained over time and ongoing training may be required. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, evaluate whether training translates into clinical practice, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery practice.; Introduction A study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. This led to the Advancing Recovery in Ireland Project (ARI) which promoted recovery-orientated services and a need to 'benchmark' progress. There is little evidence regarding the types of educational interventions that maintain positive recovery knowledge and attitudes in providers. Aim The study assessed current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. Methods The methodology of Cleary & Dowling () was replicated. A survey was administered to practitioners (n = 337) using the adapted Recovery Knowledge Inventory (RKI) (Cleary & Dowling ). Results No significant differences were found in recovery scores compared to Cleary & Dowling () or by level of experience. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better recovery scores. Significantly more respondents had received training in recovery (40% versus 23%) compared to Cleary & Dowling (). Training appears to be the strongest factor predicting better recovery knowledge. Conclusions There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery working.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: The Advancing Recovery in Ireland (ARI) project (Health Service Executive, 2012) promotes recovery-orientated services. A previous study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. To facilitate implementation of ARI and monitor progress, this study provided a 'benchmark' of current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The study provides important baseline information on recovery knowledge and attitudes which can be used to assess the impact of the ARI Project. It also provides valuable information that can be compared to recovery approaches employed in other countries. Despite the increased emphasis on recovery in Ireland, knowledge and attitudes of health care practitioners towards recovery remain relatively unchanged between 2007 and 2013. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better RKI scores. Training appears to be the strongest factor in predicting better recovery knowledge. The findings suggest that knowledge levels and attitude changes following education may not be sustained over time and ongoing training may be required. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, evaluate whether training translates into clinical practice, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery practice. ABSTRACT: Introduction A study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. This led to the Advancing Recovery in Ireland Project (ARI) which promoted recovery-orientated services and a need to 'benchmark' progress. There is little evidence regarding the types of educational interventions that maintain positive recovery knowledge and attitudes in providers. Aim The study assessed current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. Methods The methodology of Cleary & Dowling () was replicated. A survey was administered to practitioners (n = 337) using the adapted Recovery Knowledge Inventory (RKI) (Cleary & Dowling ). Results No significant differences were found in recovery scores compared to Cleary & Dowling () or by level of experience. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better recovery scores. Significantly more respondents had received training in recovery (40% versus 23%) compared to Cleary & Dowling (). Training appears to be the strongest factor predicting better recovery knowledge. Conclusions There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery working. mailto:Kathleen.Gaffey1@hse.ie
Keywords:
MENTAL HEALTH; PSYCHIATRIC CARE; NURSE
Local subject classification:
PSYCHIATRIC NURSING; RECOVERY
ISSN:
1365-2850

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.contributor.authorGaffey, Ken
dc.contributor.authorEvans, D Sen
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Fen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-31T11:17:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-31T11:17:09Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-21-
dc.identifier.citationKnowledge and attitudes of Irish Mental Health Professionals to the concept of recovery from mental illness - five years later. 2016: J Psychiatr Ment Health Nursen
dc.identifier.issn1365-2850-
dc.identifier.pmid27440748-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jpm.12325-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/619109-
dc.descriptionWHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: The Advancing Recovery in Ireland (ARI) project (Health Service Executive, 2012) promotes recovery-orientated services. A previous study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. To facilitate implementation of ARI and monitor progress, this study provided a 'benchmark' of current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The study provides important baseline information on recovery knowledge and attitudes which can be used to assess the impact of the ARI Project. It also provides valuable information that can be compared to recovery approaches employed in other countries. Despite the increased emphasis on recovery in Ireland, knowledge and attitudes of health care practitioners towards recovery remain relatively unchanged between 2007 and 2013. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better RKI scores. Training appears to be the strongest factor in predicting better recovery knowledge. The findings suggest that knowledge levels and attitude changes following education may not be sustained over time and ongoing training may be required. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, evaluate whether training translates into clinical practice, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery practice. ABSTRACT: Introduction A study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. This led to the Advancing Recovery in Ireland Project (ARI) which promoted recovery-orientated services and a need to 'benchmark' progress. There is little evidence regarding the types of educational interventions that maintain positive recovery knowledge and attitudes in providers. Aim The study assessed current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. Methods The methodology of Cleary & Dowling () was replicated. A survey was administered to practitioners (n = 337) using the adapted Recovery Knowledge Inventory (RKI) (Cleary & Dowling ). Results No significant differences were found in recovery scores compared to Cleary & Dowling () or by level of experience. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better recovery scores. Significantly more respondents had received training in recovery (40% versus 23%) compared to Cleary & Dowling (). Training appears to be the strongest factor predicting better recovery knowledge. Conclusions There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery working. mailto:Kathleen.Gaffey1@hse.ieen
dc.description.abstractWHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: The Advancing Recovery in Ireland (ARI) project (Health Service Executive, 2012) promotes recovery-orientated services. A previous study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. To facilitate implementation of ARI and monitor progress, this study provided a 'benchmark' of current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The study provides important baseline information on recovery knowledge and attitudes which can be used to assess the impact of the ARI Project. It also provides valuable information that can be compared to recovery approaches employed in other countries. Despite the increased emphasis on recovery in Ireland, knowledge and attitudes of health care practitioners towards recovery remain relatively unchanged between 2007 and 2013. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better RKI scores. Training appears to be the strongest factor in predicting better recovery knowledge. The findings suggest that knowledge levels and attitude changes following education may not be sustained over time and ongoing training may be required. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, evaluate whether training translates into clinical practice, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery practice.-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction A study of Irish mental health practitioners (Cleary & Dowling ) identified the need to improve knowledge and attitudes towards recovery. This led to the Advancing Recovery in Ireland Project (ARI) which promoted recovery-orientated services and a need to 'benchmark' progress. There is little evidence regarding the types of educational interventions that maintain positive recovery knowledge and attitudes in providers. Aim The study assessed current knowledge and attitudes to recovery. Methods The methodology of Cleary & Dowling () was replicated. A survey was administered to practitioners (n = 337) using the adapted Recovery Knowledge Inventory (RKI) (Cleary & Dowling ). Results No significant differences were found in recovery scores compared to Cleary & Dowling () or by level of experience. Working in dual settings, being a non-nurse, and training was associated with better recovery scores. Significantly more respondents had received training in recovery (40% versus 23%) compared to Cleary & Dowling (). Training appears to be the strongest factor predicting better recovery knowledge. Conclusions There is considerable scope to improve recovery knowledge. Key recommendations include the need for more recovery training, using 'Recovery Champions', introducing peer support workers and developing local policies and protocols to support recovery working.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursingen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectPSYCHIATRIC CAREen
dc.subjectNURSEen
dc.subject.otherPSYCHIATRIC NURSINGen
dc.subject.otherRECOVERYen
dc.titleKnowledge and attitudes of Irish Mental Health Professionals to the concept of recovery from mental illness - five years later.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of psychiatric and mental health nursingen
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.